Keyword: Consumer electronics

Briefs: Materials

Researchers have developed graphene-based sensing technology using G-Putty material — a highly malleable graphene blended putty. The printed sensors are 50 times more sensitive than the...

5 Ws: Electronics & Computers
The durable soft electronics could be used in wearable electronics and soft robotics and could someday be part of a stretchable smartphone.
Briefs: Communications
The approach could lead to more flexible health monitors, wearable devices, sensors, optical communication systems, and soft robotics.
Briefs: Wearables
A skin-like device can measure small facial movements in patients who have lost the ability to speak.
Briefs: Wearables
The wearable antenna bends, stretches, and compresses without compromising function.
Briefs: Wearables
The ultra-compact, wearable hologram sensor immediately notifies the user of volatile gas detection.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
The Battery Identity Global Passport could be accessible as a scannable QR code or a computer chip.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The soft, stretchy skin patch can monitor cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels at the same time.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
A triboelectric generator made of flexible circuit boards creates electricity when the wearer moves.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The organic composite material is soft, stretchable, and has good thermoelectric properties for many wearable applications.
Briefs: Wearables
A flexible device worn on the wrist harvests heat energy from the human body to monitor health.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
By capturing more cancer cells than blood draw screening, this device could help doctors understand a tumor’s biology and make decisions about treatment.
Briefs: Wearables
The smart ring shows it’s possible to detect fever before you feel it.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The app detects fluid behind the eardrum using a piece of paper and a smartphone’s microphone and speaker.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
This wearable device is placed on the skin to measure a variety of body responses, from electrical to biomechanical signals.
Briefs: AR/AI
Exoskeleton legs are capable of thinking and making control decisions on their own using artificial intelligence technology.
Articles: Sensors/Data Acquisition
MEMS sensors have been around for a long time, but requests from the market for new applications are driving upgrades in the technology.
Briefs: Transportation
The transistors enable power converters to perform at substantially improved efficiencies, especially in high-power applications.
Briefs: Materials
A smartphone, combined with nanoscale porous silicon, enables inexpensive, simple, home diagnostics.
Briefs: Wearables
A flexible, free-standing THz sensor array images blind ends of irregularly shaped objects.
Briefs: IoMT
The wearable prototype can stream, in real time, an identifying signature based on the electrical activity of a person's heart.
Briefs: IoMT
Programmed magnetic nanobeads are used to detect the virus in 55 minutes or less.
Q&A: Test & Measurement
Rutgers researcher Xiaoran Fan developed a "HeadFi" method that uses ordinary headphones as sensors.
Briefs: Imaging
The micro-display could enable smartphones and televisions with resolutions of more than 10,000 pixels per inch.
Briefs: Nanotechnology
These robust supercapacitors still work when stretched to eight times their original size.
Briefs: Wearables
Real-time health monitoring and sensing abilities of robots require soft electronics, but a challenge of using such materials lies in their reliability.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The next generation of waterproof smart fabrics can be laser-printed and made in minutes.
Briefs: Imaging
Ultra-thin and flexible metalenses could replace traditional camera lenses.
5 Ws: Robotics, Automation & Control
The battery can be used in flexible, stretchable electronics for wearables as well as soft robotics.