Keyword: Pharmaceuticals

Application Briefs: Medical

Inhalers are among the most commonly used devices for treating respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). With each inhalation through the inhaler, the...

Briefs: Materials

Georgia Tech researchers have shown that robots about the size of a particle of dust are capable of precise bidirectional control. By harnessing the power of a magnetic field generated...

Articles: Aerospace

This column presents technologies that have applications in commercial areas, possibly creating the products of tomorrow. To learn more about each technology, see the contact information provided for that...

Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
These smart lenses can be used to diagnose and treat diabetes.
Briefs: Nanotechnology
The patch enables unobtrusive drug delivery through the skin for the management of skin cancers.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
A remotely controlled microswimmer could navigate the human body and aid in drug delivery.
Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
The device combines with body power to treat tendon disease and damage, and sports injuries.
Briefs: Materials
Biobots based on muscle cells can swim at unprecedented velocities.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The device provides the first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors to detect diseases at the molecular level with near-perfect efficiency.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The device could help doctors personalize treatments.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
The new printing method coaxes particles and droplets into precise patterns using the power of sound.
Briefs: Nanotechnology
The tiny motors mimic how rock climbers navigate inclines.
Briefs: Photonics/Optics
Northwestern researchers have developed a new microscopy method that allows scientists to see the building blocks of “smart” materials.
Briefs: Materials
High-frequency sound waves can be used to build new materials, make smart nanoparticles, and even deliver drugs to the lungs for painless, needle-free vaccinations.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
The soft material demonstrates autonomous, heartbeat-like oscillating properties.
Briefs: Test & Measurement
A smartphone, combined with nanoscale porous silicon, enables inexpensive, simple, home diagnostics.
Briefs: Nanotechnology
Color changes of gold nanoparticles under the skin reveal concentration changes of substances in the body.
Briefs: Imaging
Northwestern researchers have developed a new microscopy method that allows scientists to see the building blocks of “smart” materials being formed at the nanoscale.
Briefs: Nanotechnology
A new method could jump-start the creation of tiny medical devices for the body.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
Inspired by camel fur, a two-layered material could provide extended cooling to preserve the freshness of perishable goods.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Study shows improvements to chemical sensing chip that aims to quickly and accurately identify drugs and other trace chemicals.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
This sensor makes it possible to ensure that such systems more closely mimic the function of real organs.
Articles: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A smartwatch that tracks medication levels, a flexible LED, and NASA's "Micro-Organ" device platform.
Briefs: Imaging
Laser light induces ultrasonic vibrations in a sample that can be used to image cells, blood vessels, and tissues.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Inspired by parasites, the tiny needles could help eliminate painful shots.
Briefs: Materials
This eye-on-a-chip can help treatment of dry eye disease.
Briefs: Medical
This gel-like material leads a path toward “mechanoceuticals.”
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
This material could have applications such as mixing and delivery in the pharmaceutical industry.
Briefs: Energy
This method of producing clean syngas could be used to develop a sustainable liquid fuel alternative to gasoline.