Keyword: Pharmaceuticals

Briefs: Photonics/Optics
Northwestern researchers have developed a new microscopy method that allows scientists to see the building blocks of “smart” materials.
Briefs: Materials
High-frequency sound waves can be used to build new materials, make smart nanoparticles, and even deliver drugs to the lungs for painless, needle-free vaccinations.
Briefs: Materials
The soft material demonstrates autonomous, heartbeat-like oscillating properties.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Color changes of gold nanoparticles under the skin reveal concentration changes of substances in the body.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A smartphone, combined with nanoscale porous silicon, enables inexpensive, simple, home diagnostics.
Briefs: Photonics/Optics
Northwestern researchers have developed a new microscopy method that allows scientists to see the building blocks of “smart” materials being formed at the nanoscale.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
A new method could jump-start the creation of tiny medical devices for the body.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
Inspired by camel fur, a two-layered material could provide extended cooling to preserve the freshness of perishable goods.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Study shows improvements to chemical sensing chip that aims to quickly and accurately identify drugs and other trace chemicals.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
This sensor makes it possible to ensure that such systems more closely mimic the function of real organs.
Articles: Wearables
A smartwatch that tracks medication levels, a flexible LED, and NASA's "Micro-Organ" device platform.
Briefs: Semiconductors & ICs
This eye-on-a-chip can help treatment of dry eye disease.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Laser light induces ultrasonic vibrations in a sample that can be used to image cells, blood vessels, and tissues.
Briefs: Medical
Inspired by parasites, the tiny needles could help eliminate painful shots.
Briefs: Materials
This material could have applications such as mixing and delivery in the pharmaceutical industry.
Briefs: Materials
This gel-like material leads a path toward “mechanoceuticals.”
Briefs: Energy
This method of producing clean syngas could be used to develop a sustainable liquid fuel alternative to gasoline.
Briefs: Test & Measurement
An inexpensive 3D-printed microfluidics device could be used to personalize cancer treatment.
Briefs: Materials
An engineered surface treatment can reduce waste and improve efficiency in many processes.
Briefs: Materials
3D Printing Technique Produces “Living” 4D Materials
3D/4D printing is merged with a chemical process to produce “living” resin, which has potential for recycling and biomedicine.
Briefs: Test & Measurement
This technology quickly and accurately identifies explosives, deadly chemicals, and illicit drugs.
Briefs: Materials
This electronic pill can relay diagnostic information or release drugs in response to smartphone commands.
Articles: Aerospace
Products include an aerosol scattering sensor; metal foam; and a new coated drug capsule.
Briefs: Materials

Materials with controlled porosity have found diverse applications in separation, catalysis, energy storage, sensors and actuators, tissue engineering, and drug delivery. Multiple...

Briefs: Medical

Researchers have 3D-printed an all-liquid device that, with the click of a button, can be repeatedly reconfigured on demand to serve a wide range of applications from making battery materials to screening drug...

Briefs: Propulsion

Microrobots that can deliver drugs to specific spots inside the body while being monitored and controlled from outside the body have been developed that also can treat tumors in the...

Articles: Aerospace

This column presents technologies that have applications in commercial areas, possibly creating the products of tomorrow. To learn more about each technology, see the contact information provided for that...

5 Ws: Materials
Who

Millions of people worldwide with type 1 diabetes.

Briefs: Nanotechnology
Flexible, Transparent, Wearable Bio-Patch

Silicon nanoneedle patches are currently placed between skin, muscles, or tissues where they deliver exact doses of biomolecules. Commercially available silicon nanoneedle patches are usually constructed on a rigid and opaque silicon wafer. The rigidity can cause discomfort and cannot be left in the body...