Keyword: Medical equipment and supplies

Articles: Energy
Metamaterial printing, high-efficiency solar cells, and a noise-reduction material.
5 Ws: Wearables
Who

The SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 is still a major threat to public health. Wearing a facemask is a step in protecting against infection; the new facemask also diagnoses the wearer with...

Briefs: Nanotechnology

Researchers have developed graphene-based sensing technology using G-Putty material — a highly malleable graphene blended putty. The printed sensors are 50 times more sensitive than the...

Briefs: Materials
This work could help severely injured people, such as soldiers, regain the ability to control their movements.
Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
These tactile imaging sensors can measure pressure distribution without using pressure-sensitive materials.
Briefs: Imaging
Exoskeleton legs are capable of thinking and making control decisions on their own using artificial intelligence technology.
Briefs: Transportation
A low-cost, dynamically controlled surface for 3D printers reduces waste and saves time.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A skin-like device can measure small facial movements in patients who have lost the ability to speak.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The wearable antenna bends, stretches, and compresses without compromising function.
Articles: Wearables
Water-sensing smartphone screens, a NASA-developed RF switch, and an ultrasound patch.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
A connection between electricity and mechanical motion in soft, rubber-like materials could improve robot range.
Briefs: Motion Control
This artificial muscle technology enables more human-like motion.
Briefs: Test & Measurement
Gait data and machine learning help to monitor and predict disease progression.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The soft, stretchy skin patch can monitor cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels at the same time.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
A triboelectric generator made of flexible circuit boards creates electricity when the wearer moves.
5 Ws: Packaging & Sterilization
A specially designed hydrogel works against all types of bacteria, including antibiotic-resistant ones.
Briefs: Medical
The patch can replace blood draws to test for antibodies that signal a viral or bacterial infection such as SARS-CoV-2.
Briefs: Nanotechnology
High-frequency sound waves can be used to build new materials, make smart nanoparticles, and even deliver drugs to the lungs for painless, needle-free vaccinations.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
By capturing more cancer cells than blood draw screening, this device could help doctors understand a tumor’s biology and make decisions about treatment.
Articles: Transportation
A new COVID test, a "ChromoUpdate," and NASA's brake rotor.
Briefs: Medical
The smart ring shows it’s possible to detect fever before you feel it.
Briefs: Packaging & Sterilization
A novel method was developed to produce an alkaline hydrogel that could improve wound healing.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The app detects fluid behind the eardrum using a piece of paper and a smartphone’s microphone and speaker.
Briefs: Green Design & Manufacturing
This portable method could enable hospitals to make their own supply of the disinfectant on demand and at lower cost.
Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
The soft material demonstrates autonomous, heartbeat-like oscillating properties.
Briefs: Wearables
This wearable device is placed on the skin to measure a variety of body responses, from electrical to biomechanical signals.
Briefs: Medical
The gel works even at freezing temperatures and contains natural antimicrobial compounds derived from durian husk.
Briefs: Semiconductors & ICs
This could make possible embedded devices like a spinal cord-stimulating unit with a battery-powered magnetic transmitter on a wearable belt.
Articles: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Battery recycling, NASA's water treatment, and a wireless wearable transmitter.