Keyword: Cardiovascular system

Articles: Medical
A life-saving device developed by Vascular Perfusion Solutions uses compressed oxygen to extend the life of organs for transplants.
Briefs: Wearables

Elastic polymers, known as elastomers, can be stretched and released repeatedly and are used in applications such as gloves and heart valves, where they need to last a long time without tearing. But...

Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Surgeons can use the heart model as a tool for planning and practice.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The device ultimately should be able to provide accurate signals from a person who is walking, running, or climbing stairs.
Briefs: Photonics/Optics
3D micro-printing was used to develop this small, flexible scope for looking inside blood vessels.
Briefs: Wearables
3D bioprinting using bioink from engineered stem cells enables treatment of myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Biobots based on muscle cells can swim at unprecedented velocities.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Speakers such as Amazon Echo and Google Home can monitor regular and irregular heartbeats without physical contact.
Briefs: AR/AI
“Dumb” headphones are made smart by turning them into sensors.
Briefs: Wearables
A tiny sensor chip records multiple lung and heart signals along with body movements.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Comfortable, form-fitting garments could be used to remotely track patients’ health.
NASA Spinoff: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Software that monitors astronaut health in space now monitors high-risk patients at home.
Briefs: Nanotechnology
Flexible carbon nanotube fibers woven into clothing gather accurate EKG and heart rate.
Facility Focus: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Today, Carnegie Mellon’s College of Engineering performs research in robotics, cyberphysical systems, artificial intelligence, biomedicine, energy, and other topics.
Articles: Wearables
Water-sensing smartphone screens, a NASA-developed RF switch, and an ultrasound patch.
Briefs: Wearables
A triboelectric generator made of flexible circuit boards creates electricity when the wearer moves.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The soft, stretchy skin patch can monitor cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels at the same time.
Briefs: Materials
This wearable device is placed on the skin to measure a variety of body responses, from electrical to biomechanical signals.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Biobots based on muscle cells can swim at unprecedented velocities.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Mobile radar devices could replace standard stethoscopes.
Briefs: Wearables
The wearable prototype can stream, in real time, an identifying signature based on the electrical activity of a person's heart.
Briefs: Connectivity
The device recharges the internal battery of implants without invasive surgery.
Briefs: Tubing & Extrusion
Medical instruments equipped with a soft electronics system improve diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in minimally invasive surgeries.
Briefs: Tubing & Extrusion
The stent monitors even subtle changes in the flow of blood through the artery.
Briefs: Software
The functioning human heart pump provides a model to track and trace what happens at the cell and molecular levels in the pump structure.
Briefs: Motion Control
A technique enables manufacturing of minuscule robots by interlocking multiple materials in a complex way.
Briefs: Wearables
The patch uses painless, biodegradable microneedles.
Briefs: Software
Rather than using supecomputers, heart function simulation can be performed at the CT scanner.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
This method enables users to control their robotic fingers precisely enough to gently land on fragile surfaces.