Keyword: Cardiovascular system

Articles: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Water-sensing smartphone screens, a NASA-developed RF switch, and an ultrasound patch.
Briefs: Medical
The soft, stretchy skin patch can monitor cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels at the same time.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A triboelectric generator made of flexible circuit boards creates electricity when the wearer moves.
Briefs: Materials
This wearable device is placed on the skin to measure a variety of body responses, from electrical to biomechanical signals.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Biobots based on muscle cells can swim at unprecedented velocities.
Briefs: Medical
Mobile radar devices could replace standard stethoscopes.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The wearable prototype can stream, in real time, an identifying signature based on the electrical activity of a person's heart.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Medical instruments equipped with a soft electronics system improve diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in minimally invasive surgeries.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The device recharges the internal battery of implants without invasive surgery.
Briefs: Test & Measurement
The stent monitors even subtle changes in the flow of blood through the artery.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
The functioning human heart pump provides a model to track and trace what happens at the cell and molecular levels in the pump structure.
Briefs: Materials
A technique enables manufacturing of minuscule robots by interlocking multiple materials in a complex way.
Briefs: Wearables
The patch uses painless, biodegradable microneedles.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
This method enables users to control their robotic fingers precisely enough to gently land on fragile surfaces.
Briefs: Imaging
Rather than using supecomputers, heart function simulation can be performed at the CT scanner.
Briefs: Medical
High-Performance, Low-Field MRI for Cardiac and Lung Imaging
The system could enhance image-guided procedures that diagnose and treat disease and make medical imaging more affordable and accessible.
Q&A: Materials
A new class of medical instruments uses flexible electronics to improve patient outcomes in minimally invasive surgeries.
Briefs: Photonics/Optics
A new proof-of-concept photonic pH sensor could advance studies of tissue regeneration.
Briefs: Medical
The removable adhesive could make it easier for surgeons to close up internal wounds.
Briefs: Wearables
The system looks for chemical indicators found in sweat to give a real-time snapshot of what’s happening inside the body.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
The device provides quick results and gives healthcare workers more time to treat patients in hospitals and other settings.
Articles: Manufacturing & Prototyping
NASA's Dry Goods Delivery System, a lung-heart sensor on a chip, and more.
Briefs: Communications
This device could give doctors a new therapeutic option for treating patients with conditions such as heart failure.
Briefs: Medical
This gel releases short gene sequences into the heart muscle to heal it following a heart attack.
Briefs: Materials
The adhesive that binds wet surfaces within seconds could be used to heal wounds or implant medical devices.
Briefs: Wearables
Drones, smartphones, and sensors could provide a lifeline to the world’s growing elderly population at risk of falls.
Briefs: Wearables
This vibrometer has uses in analyzing spasms in humans, as a breath analyzer for diagnosis of cancer and other diseases, and as a preventative healthcare sensor.
NASA Spinoff: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Research in astronaut monitoring leads to virtual reality spinoffs.
Articles: Aerospace
Heartbeat-based biometrics, sonic-boom displays, and an artificial leaf.