Keyword: Bacteria

Articles: Sensors/Data Acquisition
With its instant repellency and its ability to repel rather than kill or deactivate pathogens, RepelWrap presents an effective alternative to current technologies.
Briefs: Test & Measurement

Foodborne illness hits about one in six people in the United States every year from more than 31 recognized pathogens including E. coli O157:H7, a particularly harsh strain of E. coli. Researchers...

Briefs: Materials

Optical limiting — a manner of telecom switching without the use of electronics — is an all-optical method that could improve the speed and capacity of Internet communications. A...

Articles: Aerospace

This column presents technologies that have applications in commercial areas, possibly creating the products of tomorrow. To learn more about each technology, see the contact information provided for that innovation.

Briefs: Wearables
The smartphone-based device could reduce the pressure on testing laboratories during a pandemic.
Briefs: Nanotechnology
The coatings eradicated human influenza and coronavirus in five minutes.
Briefs: Materials
A remotely controlled microswimmer could navigate the human body and aid in drug delivery.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The portable device can differentiate among bacteria, viruses, and other biothreats.
Briefs: Green Design & Manufacturing
The method could be applied to carbon waste streams.
Briefs: Materials
The tiny motors mimic how rock climbers navigate inclines.
5 Ws: Packaging & Sterilization
A specially designed hydrogel works against all types of bacteria, including antibiotic-resistant ones.
Briefs: Packaging & Sterilization
This treatment has the potential to remove from drinking water nearly all viruses that have an “outer fortress.”
Briefs: Green Design & Manufacturing
Prototypes show promise as a low-cost, natural filtration option.
Briefs: Test & Measurement
A smartphone, combined with nanoscale porous silicon, enables inexpensive, simple, home diagnostics.
Articles: Materials
Read all about this year's "Create the Future" winner: A transparent flexible film called "RepelWrap."
Briefs: Materials
The technique could easily be translated into existing medical device manufacturing processes for use in orthopedic implants.
Briefs: Test & Measurement
This device could be used to find threats to ecosystems.
Briefs: Green Design & Manufacturing
Bacteria-Based Hydrogel Beads Clean Up Contaminated Groundwater
Beads that contain bacteria and a slow-release food supply to sustain them can clean up contaminated groundwater for months on end, maintenance-free.
Briefs: Aerospace
Applications exist both on Mars and on Earth.
5 Ws: Photonics/Optics
Bacterial pathogens can live on surfaces for days. What if frequently touched surfaces, such as doorknobs, could instantly kill them off?
Briefs: Energy
The rainproof, stainproof technology turns clothing into self-powered remotes while turning away bacteria.
Briefs: Materials
The coating can prevent the transfer of antibiotic-resistant superbugs and other bacteria in settings ranging from hospitals to kitchens.
Briefs: Green Design & Manufacturing

According to the United Nations, 2.1 billion people lack access to safely managed drinking water services and the majority live in developing nations. A process was...

NASA Spinoff: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Methane is everywhere on Earth. It’s the main ingredient in the natural gas that powers heating, cooking, and electricity. It’s also a potent greenhouse gas. The presence of methane is also interesting...

Briefs: Energy

Certain species of bacteria that exist in oxygen-deprived environments must find a way to breathe that doesn't involve oxygen. These microbes — which can be found deep within mines, at...

Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems

A new method uses ultraviolet light to control the flow of fluids by encouraging particles — from plastic microbeads, to bacterial spores, to pollutants — to...

Briefs: Test & Measurement
Smartphone Test Spots Poisoned Water Risk

Researchers have developed a biosensor that attaches to a smartphone and uses bacteria to detect unsafe arsenic levels. The device generates easy-to-interpret patterns similar to volume-bars that display the level of contamination.

Briefs: Electronics & Computers

Used since 2013, electroceutical bandages — which use electrical impulses to treat medical issues — kill bacteria around a wound, allowing wounds to heal faster. In addition, if infection is...

Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems

Researchers, drawing inspiration from bacteria, have designed smart, bio-compatible microrobots that are highly flexible. Because these devices are able to swim through fluids and modify their shape...

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