Keyword: Satellites

Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Besides miniature spacecraft propulsion systems, the valve could also have applications in the industrial processing industry where low flow devices are commonly used.
NASA Spinoff: Manufacturing & Prototyping
NASA resources helped mature technologies to make CubeSats more capable, so everyone can use them.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control

In-space and planetary surface assembly for human exploration is a challenging domain that encompasses various technological thrusts to support human missions. NASA is developing autonomous assembly agents to...

Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping

The Modular Artificial-Gravity Orbital Refinery Spacecraft (MAGORS) is a technology from NASA Ames Research Center for in-situ refining or recycling of materials in space, including mass...

Application Briefs: Manned Systems
A platform makes space-bound systems quick, easy, and cost-effective to develop.
Application Briefs: Test & Measurement
How CSEM and its partners are using magnetic levitation to counter unwanted vibrations from components aboard satellites.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
This system would extend the life of CubeSat satellites.
Briefs: Software
The simulations provide insight on the models needed to simulate a full-scale landing event.
Application Briefs: Photonics/Optics
With advanced tech, mirrors can be made with high accuracy.
Application Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Learn about the interconnects that are supporting today's miniature satellites.
Briefs: Test & Measurement
The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) will usher in a new era of laser communications.
Application Briefs: Power
The power and propulsion element of NASA’s Gateway is a high-power, 50-kilowatt solar electric propulsion spacecraft.
Application Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
A mobile robot will go to the South Pole of the Moon — with help from radiation-hardened avionics.
Articles: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
With Artemis II — the first crewed flight of SLS and Orion — four astronauts will travel to the lunar environment in 2024.
Articles: Aerospace
Artemis I will launch from Kennedy Space Center into Earth orbit, where it will travel 40,000 miles beyond the Moon.
Articles: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
With the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft, NASA will return humans to the lunar surface.
Application Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
As the U.S. lands a craft on the Moon for the first time since 1972, technology built by Louisiana State University students will report back from the lunar surface.
Briefs: RF & Microwave Electronics
The valve enables telerobotic resupplying of media such as propellant and pressurant.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The flexible antenna was designed for active aeronautical satellite communications.
Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Applications include manned deep space exploration and terrestrial CO2 removal systems.
Briefs: Software
The open-architecture flight software package provides solutions for onboard orbit determination.
Application Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
The Cold Operable Lunar Deployable Arm (COLDArm) is a first-of-its-kind robotic technology.
Briefs: RF & Microwave Electronics
Using microwaves reduces the cost of launching rockets.
Briefs: Nanotechnology
The thruster provides a low-cost, extremely efficient propulsion source for miniature satellites.
Briefs: Photonics/Optics
A team has introduced a new method for taking high-res images of fast-moving and rotating objects in space, such as satellites or debris in low-Earth orbit.
Articles: Aerospace
See how WiBotic — a maker of wireless charging and fleet energy management technologies — is preparing robots for the Moon.
Articles: Aerospace
Highly purified, low-outgassing silicones prevent material degradation in satellites and space vehicles.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The technology could continuously monitor fluid flow in pipes on the International Space Station and prevent satellites from colliding.
Briefs: Materials
Ultra-thin and flexible metalenses could replace traditional camera lenses.