5 Steps to a 15+ Year Rackmount Computer Lifecycle

Many applications, such as government, military, medical, and embedded system designs struggle with the typical computer product lifecycles. Most commercial-grade computers have a 1-2 year lifecycle before the computer is EOL (End of Life). There are also very few assurances that the rack mount computer is properly revision-controlled so you can rest assured that nothing inside the computer changes the form, fit, or function. Engineers spend a lot of time and energy determining the right specs, validating the product, getting industry certifications, and then finally getting to full production...and in many cases this spec, test, and certification process can take longer than the computer’s 1-2 year lifecycle.

Posted in: White Papers, Electronics & Computers
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Researchers Print the Unprintable: Kapton

Kapton, a material used in electronics and aerospace applications, has only been available in sheet form. Researchers from Virginia Tech have found a way to 3D-print a polymer with Kapton's structural characteristics.

Posted in: News, News, Aerospace, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials
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Mathematical Modeling of Lithium-Ion Cells

In Conjunction with SAE

If you are interested in modeling lithium-ion cells in COMSOL Multiphysics®, then tune into this webinar. In this presentation, you will learn about using COMSOL Multiphysics® to develop a physics-based lithium-ion cell model from guest speaker Dr. Ralph White, professor of chemical engineering and a distinguished scientist at the University of South Carolina.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars, Electronics
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Nanowire “Inks” for Paper-Based Printable Electronics

Highly conductive films make functional circuits without adding high heat.

Printed electronics must be heated to melt all the nanoparticles together into a single conductive wire, making it impossible to print circuits on inexpensive plastics or paper. A study shows that tweaking the shape of the nanoparticles in the ink could eliminate the need for heat.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Electronic equipment, Electronic equipment, Additive manufacturing, Conductivity
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Electrically Conducting Nanoscale Sheets for Reconfigurable Electronics

Almost all aspects of modern life, such as communications and healthcare, depend on microelectronic devices. The demand for more powerful, smaller technology keeps growing, meaning that the tiniest devices are now composed of just a few atoms. One way to solve the problem of making electronic circuits smaller is to make them more flexible so they can serve one purpose and then be completely reconfigured for another purpose.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers
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Products of Tomorrow: September 2017

This column presents technologies that have applications in commercial areas, possibly creating the products of tomorrow. To learn more about each technology, see the contact information provided for that innovation.

Posted in: Articles, Electronics & Computers, Materials, Windows and windshields, Solar energy, Medical equipment and supplies, Product development
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DIGITALIZATION: The New Critical Success Factor

The terms Industry 4.0, Big Data, the Internet of Things, and the Digital Factory are being pitched around like a rugby ball, and almost always with a decided lack of clear definition. Let’s set the record straight.

Posted in: Articles, Electronics & Computers, Sensors, Computer simulation, Big data, Cyber security, Internet of things, Big data, Cyber security, Internet of things, Computer integrated manufacturing
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3D Chip Combines Computing and Data Storage

Memory cells and carbon nanotubes are built vertically over one another, making a 3D computer architecture with interleaving layers of logic and memory.

Fields ranging from autonomous driving to personalized medicine are generating huge amounts of data. But just as the flood of data is reaching massive proportions, the ability of computer chips to process it into useful information is stalling.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Architecture, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Integrated circuits, Architecture, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Integrated circuits, Data management, Product development
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Shaper Design in CMOS for High Dynamic Range

This circuit design has uses in industrial automation, medical signal processing, and radiation detection for medical and security applications.

Front-end electronics for capacitive sensors typically include a preamplifier followed by a filter. The preamplifier provides low-noise amplification of the signals induced in the sensor electrodes. The filter, by properly limiting the signal bandwidth, maximizes the Signal-to-Noise (S/N) ratio. Additionally, the filter limits the duration of the output signal associated with the measured event and, for those sensors where the induced signal is relatively slow, it maximizes the signal amplitude.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Design processes, Amplifiers, Electronic equipment, Sensors and actuators, Amplifiers, Electronic equipment, Sensors and actuators, Noise, Noise
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Boost Economics in Agile High Throughput Satcom Payloads

The inexorable demand for bandwidth fuels the need for agile systems throughout data networks. Even satellite communications are undergoing transformative digital developments. Innovative architectures supported by new, ultra-wideband (UWB) data convertors are helping boost both their economics and data throughput. Read this white paper from Teledyne e2v to find out just how these UWB data converters are affecting payload system design choices to boost economics and delivering new price points.

Posted in: White Papers, Aerospace, Defense, Electronics & Computers
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