Flexible, Printable Electronics for Sensor Arrays

Printable electronics — flexible circuitry that is deposited on some type of plastic substrate — has been a major area of research for decades. But the ability to print the substrate itself greatly increases the range of devices the technique can yield.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Integrated circuits, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Integrated circuits, Plastics
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Single Event Upset Suppression System (SEUSS)

Electronic devices are getting smaller and more energy-efficient, meaning that they are more susceptible to single event upsets (SEUs) — malfunctions caused by particles in the atmosphere interfering with electronic systems. The need increases as these devices get smaller, since particles that cause these upsets can even come from the packages that house the devices. This is especially prevalent in the aerospace industry, since working at higher altitudes means increased exposure to cosmic ray particles.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Electromagnetic compatibility, Electronic equipment, Electromagnetic compatibility, Electronic equipment, Radiation protection
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Device for and Method of Computer Intrusion Anticipation, Detection, and Remediation

Initially, relatively powerful computers were constructed as unique mainframes operated by larger corporations on isolated networks. Then, computers with modest amounts of computing power were made available to individuals as standalone personal computers. The computing power of personal computers and the applications for which they could be used were increased by networking them with other computers throughout the world using ancillary devices (e.g., servers, routers, links, switches, hubs, etc.). An arrangement into which computer and ancillary devices are configured is called a topology. There are many different types of topologies (e.g., bus, ring, star, tree, mesh, etc.).

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Architecture, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Wireless communication systems, Architecture, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Wireless communication systems
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Integrated Three-Dimensional Module Heat Exchanger for Power Electronics Cooling

Critical elements in the operation of electric drive systems are power electronics and power semiconductor packages. Improving thermal management of power electronics can help reduce the cost, weight, and volume of electric drive systems, and thus increase market acceptance. The power semiconductor packaging must provide the necessary electrical connections, while at the same time enabling heat removal from the semiconductor devices such as insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) and diodes.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Power electronics, Semiconductor devices, Power electronics, Semiconductor devices, Heat exchangers, Heat exchangers
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High-Energy-Storage Capacitor

A method was created for electroless deposition of conformal ultrathin (<20 nm) metal oxides on the high-surface-area walls of commercial carbon nanofoam papers, typically 0.1–0.3 mm thick. The resulting ultrathin metal oxides rapidly take up and release electrons and ions, thereby storing energy at 300–600 Farads per gram of oxide, while the carbon nanofoam paper serves as a three-dimensional current collector and defines a pre-selected porous electrode architecture.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Capacitors, Capacitors, Additive manufacturing, Fabrication, Nanomaterials
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Flexible Wearable Electronics Use Body Heat for Energy

Interest in wearable electronics for continuous, long-term health and performance monitoring is rapidly increasing. The reduction in power levels consumed by sensors and electronic circuits, accompanied by the advances in energy harvesting methods, allows for the realization of self-powered monitoring systems that do not have to rely on batteries.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Electronic equipment, Sensors and actuators, Electronic equipment, Sensors and actuators, Energy consumption, Medical, health, and wellness, Thermodynamics, Thermodynamics
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Nanowire “Inks” for Paper-Based Printable Electronics

Printed electronics must be heated to melt all the nanoparticles together into a single conductive wire, making it impossible to print circuits on inexpensive plastics or paper. A study shows that tweaking the shape of the nanoparticles in the ink could eliminate the need for heat.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Electronic equipment, Electronic equipment, Additive manufacturing, Conductivity
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Electrically Conducting Nanoscale Sheets for Reconfigurable Electronics

Almost all aspects of modern life, such as communications and healthcare, depend on microelectronic devices. The demand for more powerful, smaller technology keeps growing, meaning that the tiniest devices are now composed of just a few atoms. One way to solve the problem of making electronic circuits smaller is to make them more flexible so they can serve one purpose and then be completely reconfigured for another purpose.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Integrated circuits, Integrated circuits, Conductivity, Materials properties, Nanomaterials
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3D Chip Combines Computing and Data Storage

Fields ranging from autonomous driving to personalized medicine are generating huge amounts of data. But just as the flood of data is reaching massive proportions, the ability of computer chips to process it into useful information is stalling.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Architecture, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Integrated circuits, Architecture, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Integrated circuits, Data management, Product development
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Shaper Design in CMOS for High Dynamic Range

Front-end electronics for capacitive sensors typically include a preamplifier followed by a filter. The preamplifier provides low-noise amplification of the signals induced in the sensor electrodes. The filter, by properly limiting the signal bandwidth, maximizes the Signal-to-Noise (S/N) ratio. Additionally, the filter limits the duration of the output signal associated with the measured event and, for those sensors where the induced signal is relatively slow, it maximizes the signal amplitude.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Semiconductors & ICs, Design processes, Amplifiers, Electronic equipment, Sensors and actuators, Amplifiers, Electronic equipment, Sensors and actuators, Noise, Noise
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