Keyword: Implants & Prosthetics

Medical

Podcasts: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
This episode of our Tech Briefs podcast series Here’s an Idea™ explores a variety of new-and-improved hearing aids, from $5 “do-it-yourself” devices to advanced systems that monitor brain waves.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
These implants can provide doctors with regular activity updates and are powered by the patient’s movement.
Briefs: Medical
This technique may enable speedy, on-demand design of softer, safer neural devices.
5 Ws: Medical
Bacterial pathogens can live on surfaces for days. What if frequently touched surfaces, such as doorknobs, could instantly kill them off?
Briefs: Nanotechnology
The material consists solely of components that have already been shown to work well in the body.
Briefs: Medical
This device could give doctors a new therapeutic option for treating patients with conditions such as heart failure.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
A new way of making polymers adhere to surfaces may enable better biomedical sensors and implants.
Briefs: Materials
The adhesive that binds wet surfaces within seconds could be used to heal wounds or implant medical devices.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
These electrode implants will allow people with a dysfunctional inner ear to hear again.
Q&A: Materials
David Kaplan is solidifying silk to make products like rods and plates for medical implants.
Articles: Aerospace
Life-saving sensors, soft hearing implants, and a new water-decontamination method
News: Electronics & Computers

Medical implants of the future may feature reconfigurable electronic platforms that can morph in shape and size dynamically as bodies change or transform to relocate...

Briefs: Software
The simulator could help in the development of new back braces.
Facility Focus: Test & Measurement
In recent decades, NSF-funded researchers have discovered quite a bit, including many of the fundamental particles of matter.
Briefs: Medical
Smart Electronic Skin for Robots and Prosthetics

Humans use the sense of touch to accomplish almost every daily task such as picking up a cup of coffee or shaking someone’s hand. Without it, humans can even lose their sense of balance when walking. Similarly, robots need to have a sense of touch in order to interact better with humans but...

Briefs: Medical

Researchers have developed a formula that enables them to recreate different levels of perceived softness. Based on the results from their experiments, they created equations that can calculate how...

Features: Medical
Learn more about ULISSES, an organ-preserving device that received top honors in the "Create the Future" Design Contest.
Articles: Medical
Learn more about the how "CSD" offers a cost-effective, non-invasive way of saving the lives of infants.
Blog: Medical
Learn more about ULiSSES, a life-saving device for organ and limb transport.
Briefs: Materials

While different approaches have been used to create artificial muscles — including hydraulic systems, servomotors, shape-memory metals, and polymers that respond to stimuli — they all have limitations such...

Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Wearing a sensor-packed glove while handling a variety of objects, researchers compiled a dataset that enables an AI system to recognize objects through touch alone. The information...

Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping

For the millions of people every year who have or need medical devices implanted, an advancement in 3D printing technology could enable significantly quicker...

Facility Focus: Defense

In October 1962, the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Unit was established with a goal of providing specialized medical and physiological support to help close the gap between Army...

Articles: Sensors/Data Acquisition

This column presents technologies that have applications in commercial areas, possibly creating the products of tomorrow. To learn more about each technology, see the contact information provided for that...

5 Ws: Medical
Who

Millions of people who rely on pacemakers, defibrillators, and other livesaving implantable devices powered by batteries that need to be replaced every five to 10 years.

Briefs: Nanotechnology

Titanium is as strong as steel but about twice as light. These properties depend on the way a metal’s atoms are stacked but random defects that arise in the...

Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems

Inspired by the human eye, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed an adaptive metalens that is essentially a flat,...

Briefs: Materials

Titanium is as strong as steel but about twice as light. These properties depend on the way a metal's atoms are stacked, but random defects that arise in the...

Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control

A novel foot-pedal-operated system and device were developed to control translational and rotational movement of an object in three-dimensional (3D) space. The Foot Pedal Controller system enables operators to control...