Keyword: Wearables

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Blog: Medical
Researchers have developed a method to make adaptive and eco-friendly sensors that can be directly and imperceptibly printed onto a wide range of biological surfaces.
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INSIDER: Nanotechnology

Silicon semiconductors have become the ‘oil’ of the computer age, as was demonstrated recently by the chip shortage crisis. However, one of the disadvantages...

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Briefs: Energy
Researchers have found ways to develop soft OECTs for wearable pressure sensors. They first experimented with a solid type of gating substance: a charged, gelatinous substance called an ionic hydrogel. Read on to learn more.
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Briefs: Materials
An international team of researchers from Japan and Austria has invented new ultraflexible patches with a ferroelectric polymer that can not only sense a patient’s pulse and blood pressure, but also power themselves from normal movements. The key was starting with a substrate just 1-μm thick.
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Articles: Sensors/Data Acquisition
See the products of tomorrow, including a new DC-DC power converter developed by engineers at the Kobe University, a haptic device capable of reproducing the softness of various materials developed by EPFL researchers, and three-dimensional embroidery techniques from engineers from NC State University.
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5 Ws: Medical
Rice University engineers have developed the smallest implantable brain stimulator demonstrated in a human patient that could revolutionize treatment for drug-resistant depression and other psychiatric or neurological disorders.
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Briefs: Medical
A pair of earbuds can be turned into a tool to record the electrical activity of the brain as well as levels of lactate in the body with the addition of two flexible sensors screen-printed onto a stamp-like flexible surface.
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Special Reports: Sensors/Data Acquisition
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Aerospace & Defense Sensing - April 2024

The world's first long‐range radio communications with an atomic quantum sensor…a sensor material 10x stronger than Kevlar…a microchip combining two Nobel Prize‐winning techniques to monitor...

Podcasts: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Exploring how innovations in wearables are making treatments more precise, portable, and patient-friendly than ever before.
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Podcasts: Medical
Exploring how AI algorithms analyze and interpret the data collected, leading to more accurate diagnostics and predictive insights.
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Podcasts: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Exploring advancements in wearable injector technology, examining how these devices are transforming the administration of medications, improving patient adherence, and enhancing the overall effectiveness of treatment plans.
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Podcasts: Medical
DNA-based biosensors offer a highly sensitive and specific approach for detecting a range of target molecules.
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Briefs: Electronics & Computers
A research team has successfully overcome the limitations of soft strain sensors by integrating computer vision technology into optical sensors. The team developed a sensor technology known as computer vision-based optical strain (CVOS) during its study. Unlike conventional sensors reliant on electrical signals, CVOS sensors employ computer vision and optical sensors to analyze microscale optical patterns, extracting data regarding changes.
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Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A first-of-its-kind robotic glove is lending a “hand” and providing hope to piano players who have suffered a disabling stroke. Developed by researchers from Florida Atlantic University’s College of Engineering and Computer Science, the soft robotic hand exoskeleton uses artificial intelligence to improve hand dexterity.
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Podcasts: Sensors/Data Acquisition
An at home, non-invasive for urge urinary incontinence and urinary urgency without the need for surgery, implants, or drugs demonstrated to potential of wearable neuromodulation.
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Podcasts: Wearables
Medical-grade wearables can increase patient engagement and gather robust data for clinical trials.
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Podcasts: Medical
Wearable medical devices must balance the need for continuous monitoring with power efficiency.
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Podcasts: Wearables
Achieving interoperability as medical-grade wearables integrate with diverse healthcare systems.
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INSIDER: Data Acquisition

An international research group has engineered a novel high-strength flexible device by combining piezoelectric composites with unidirectional carbon fiber (UDCF), an anisotropic...

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INSIDER: Sensors/Data Acquisition

New research from Flinders University and UNSW Sydney, published in ACS Nano, explores switchable polarization in a new class of silicon compatible metal...

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INSIDER: Data Acquisition

Continuous monitoring of sweat can reveal valuable information about human health, such as the body’s glucose levels. However, wearable sensors previously developed for...

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Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The next generation of wearable computing technology will be even closer to the wearer than a watch or glasses: It will be affixed to the skin.
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Blog: Medical
Researchers developed a prototype for the Li-ion battery, which could lead to stretchy electronics or even clothes that monitor health.
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Briefs: Design
Researchers from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have developed biosensor technology that will allow you to operate devices, such as robots and machines, solely through thought-control.
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Podcasts: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Nutromics breakthrough technology combines multiple DNA sensors with microneedles.
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Quiz: Sensors/Data Acquisition
MEMS sensors are being integrated into more and more kinds of devices. Although we might not be aware of it, most people rely on them every day. How much do you know about MEMS? Test yourself with this quiz.
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Podcasts: Medical
Biotricity’s continuous heart rhythm monitor uses advanced technology to deliver unlimited heart data insights.
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Blog: Medical
The wearable sensor aims to help patients who suffer from muscle atrophy monitor changes to their health in a more convenient way.
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Articles: Wearables
Researchers have developed a way to detect bacteria, toxins, and dangerous chemicals in the environment using a biopolymer sensor that can be printed like ink on a wide range of materials.
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