Keyword: Smart Patches and Bandages

Wearables

Articles: Wearables
This column presents technologies that have applications in commercial areas, possibly creating the products of tomorrow.
On-Demand Webinars: Medical

Digital technology is transforming healthcare, from treating patients after they get sick to a future of preventive care. This shift is being enabled by multiple exponential...

Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Researchers have developed electronic skin (e-skin) that is applied directly on top of real skin. Made from soft, flexible rubber, it can be embedded with sensors that...

Briefs: Medical

Engineers have created a flexible electronic sensing patch that can be sewn into clothing to analyze sweat for multiple markers. The patch could be used to diagnose and monitor...

Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Soft pressure sensors have received significant research attention in a variety of fields including soft robotics, electronic skin, and wearable electronics. Researchers have developed a highly sensitive...

Question of the Week: Electronics & Computers
Would You Wear a Microgrid?

Our April issue of Tech Briefs highlighted a wearable microgrid that powers electronics by harvesting energy from the wearer’s body. The wearable (shown here) has three components: sweat-powered biofuel cells, motion-powered devices called triboelectric generators, and energy-storing supercapacitors. All parts are...

Briefs: Wearables
The wearable device offers options for treating antibiotic-resistant infections and wounds.
Briefs: Wearables
The patch enables unobtrusive drug delivery through the skin for the management of skin cancers.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
3D bioprinting using bioink from engineered stem cells enables treatment of myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases.
Facility Focus: Wearables
Learn about the technologies being developed at NC State, including vehicle armor, a monitoring patch for plants, and origami-inspired materials.
Podcasts: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Microneedles offer an intriguing alternative to the drug-delivery devices we know and don't love.
Articles: Electronics & Computers
Water-sensing smartphone screens, a NASA-developed RF switch, and an ultrasound patch.
Briefs: Semiconductors & ICs
The wearable antenna bends, stretches, and compresses without compromising function.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The soft, stretchy skin patch can monitor cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels at the same time.
Briefs: Medical
The patch can replace blood draws to test for antibodies that signal a viral or bacterial infection such as SARS-CoV-2.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
This wearable device is placed on the skin to measure a variety of body responses, from electrical to biomechanical signals.
Articles: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Battery recycling, NASA's water treatment, and a wireless wearable transmitter.
INSIDER: Test & Measurement

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and...

Application Briefs: Wearables

Over the last 75 years, sensors have played an increasingly significant part in the advancement of medicine.

Briefs: Electronics & Computers
Thanks to its flexibility and adhesion, the biodegradable display can be worn directly on the hand.
Briefs: Wearables
Nearly 100% of all-carbon-based transistors are reclaimed while retaining future functionality of the materials.
5 Ws: Robotics, Automation & Control
A medical patch can be folded around minimally invasive surgical tools and delivered through airways, intestines, and other narrow spaces.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The next generation of waterproof smart fabrics can be laser-printed and made in minutes.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A patch of needles connected to a paper sensor diagnoses conditions such as prediabetes.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Real-time health monitoring and sensing abilities of robots require soft electronics, but a challenge of using such materials lies in their reliability.
INSIDER: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Scientists around the world are working to develop electronic skins that attach to the body and monitor vital signs. These E-skins need to be comfortable, breathable, and flexible for...

Briefs: Materials
This system can track the motion of the entire body with a small sensory network.
Briefs: Medical
The patch uses painless, biodegradable microneedles.
Articles: Energy
A malaria-test "bandage"; underwater navigation via sound; and a biodegrading, implantable sensor.