Keyword: Wearables

Wearables

Question of the Week: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Will Stretchable Smartphones Catch On?

Our “5 Ws” feature this month highlighted skin-like electronic circuits being developed at Virginia Tech.

INSIDER: Energy

While researchers around the globe are working on free-position wireless charging — which would unchain devices from set charging points — the most common...

Briefs: Materials

Researchers have developed graphene-based sensing technology using G-Putty material — a highly malleable graphene blended putty. The printed sensors are 50 times more sensitive than the...

5 Ws: Electronics & Computers
The durable soft electronics could be used in wearable electronics and soft robotics and could someday be part of a stretchable smartphone.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Designed for soldier uniforms, the fiber can sense, store, analyze, and infer activity when sewn into a piece of clothing.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The approach could lead to more flexible health monitors, wearable devices, sensors, optical communication systems, and soft robotics.
Briefs: Imaging
Exoskeleton legs are capable of thinking and making control decisions on their own using artificial intelligence technology.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
A skin-like device can measure small facial movements in patients who have lost the ability to speak.
Facility Focus: Automotive
Learn about the batteries, skin sensors, flexible antennas, and other cutting-edge research coming from Penn State Engineering.
Briefs: Semiconductors & ICs
The wearable antenna bends, stretches, and compresses without compromising function.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The technology would enable transmission of information just by touching a surface.
Articles: Wearables
Water-sensing smartphone screens, a NASA-developed RF switch, and an ultrasound patch.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The ultra-compact, wearable hologram sensor immediately notifies the user of volatile gas detection.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
Applications include wearables, airplane cabin monitoring, medical diagnostics, and indoor air quality measurement.
Special Reports: Materials
Medical Robotics - September 2021

Self-propelled nanobots that deliver drugs inside the human body...novel sensors that improve the safety and precision of industrial robots...a dynamic hydrogel material that makes building soft robotic...

INSIDER: Sensors/Data Acquisition

A study by researchers at the Texas A&M University School of Public Health shows that inexpensive and convenient devices such as silicone wristbands can be used to yield quantitative...

INSIDER: Electronics & Computers

When you pick up a balloon, the pressure to keep hold of it is different from what you would exert to grasp a jar. And now engineers at MIT and elsewhere have a way to precisely...

INSIDER: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Ultrathin, flexible computer circuits have been an engineering goal for years, but technical hurdles have prevented the degree of miniaturization necessary to achieve high performance....

Briefs: Wearables
The soft, stretchy skin patch can monitor cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels at the same time.
Briefs: Wearables
A triboelectric generator made of flexible circuit boards creates electricity when the wearer moves.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
The organic composite material is soft, stretchable, and has good thermoelectric properties for many wearable applications.
Facility Focus: Robotics, Automation & Control
WPI supports research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, cybersecurity, and fire safety.
Briefs: Energy
A flexible device worn on the wrist harvests heat energy from the human body to monitor health.
Briefs: Wearables
By capturing more cancer cells than blood draw screening, this device could help doctors understand a tumor’s biology and make decisions about treatment.
Special Reports: Power
Power Electronics - August 2021

This compendium of recent articles from the editors of Tech Briefs and Aerospace & Defense Technology looks at the latest advances in power electronics and energy storage for a range of applications...

Question of the Week: Energy
Will ‘Sweat Power’ Make Wearables Mainstream?

Engineers at the University of California San Diego developed a thin, flexible strip that can be worn on a fingertip and generate small amounts of electricity when a person’s finger sweats or presses on it. (Watch the demo on Tech Briefs TV.)

Briefs: Wearables
The smart ring shows it’s possible to detect fever before you feel it.
Briefs: Medical
The app detects fluid behind the eardrum using a piece of paper and a smartphone’s microphone and speaker.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
This wearable device is placed on the skin to measure a variety of body responses, from electrical to biomechanical signals.