News

Electric ‘Smart’ Paper Picks Up on Pipe Leaks

Although spills inside a lab can often spell trouble, a University of Washington scientist found a way to turn an accidentally doused conductive material into an inventive new sensor. The lab mishap led to a “smart” paper that conducts electricity and provides wireless detection of water pipe leaks.

Posted in: News, Composites, Materials, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors
Read More >>

New Solar Power Receivers are Better at Absorbing Sunlight

Sandia National Laboratories engineers have developed new fractal-like, concentrating solar power receivers for small- to medium-scale use that are up to 20 percent more effective at absorbing sunlight than current technology.

Posted in: INSIDER, Energy Efficiency, Solar Power
Read More >>

Asphalt Helps Batteries Charge Faster

A touch of asphalt may be the secret to creating high-capacity lithium metal batteries that charge 10 to 20 times faster than commercial lithium-ion batteries, according to Rice University scientists. In addition, the asphalt-containing batteries do not catch fire or explode, and manufacturing is simplified.

Posted in: INSIDER, Energy Efficiency
Read More >>

Body Energy as a Power Source

Smartphones, fitness trackers, and medical equipment have a constant hunger for power. The solution: power supply by means of energy produced by body movements. Two systems that meet this requirement were developed. One design uses body weight during walking, and the other generator can be worn on the wrist like a wristwatch.

Posted in: INSIDER, Energy, Energy Efficiency
Read More >>

Sound-Off: Without ‘100-Percent’ Security Assurance, Should We Drive Autonomous Cars?

In a Tech Briefs presentation, a reader asked our automotive expert: “How can we achieve autonomous cars without 100-percent cybersecurity?”

Posted in: News, Automotive
Read More >>

Will 'read-ahead' algorithms speed up 3D printing?

Our featured INSIDER story today showcased algorithms that allow 3D printers to anticipate motion and "read ahead" of its programming. The Michigan State University readers believe that the faster, more precise builds will allow 3D printers to create products twice as fast.

What do you think? Will 'read-ahead' algorithms speed up 3D printing?

Posted in: Question of the Week, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Software
Read More >>

A Semiconductor Breakthrough: Carbon Nanotubes Boost Thermoelectric Performance

In a report published in October, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNCTs) to advance the thermoelectric performance of organic semiconductors. The carbon nanotube thin films, they said, could ultimately be integrated into fabrics to convert waste heat into electricity or serve as a small power source.

Posted in: News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Harvesting, Energy Storage, Thermoelectrics, Composites, Materials, Semiconductors & ICs
Read More >>

Thinking Ahead with 3D Printing: Five Technologies to Watch

A 3D printer's moving parts can lead to vibrations and a flawed final product. Engineers at the University of Michigan anticipated the problem — and now, thanks to their algorithms, machines can do the same.

Posted in: News, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling
Read More >>

Unique Imaging of Dinosaur's Skull Tells Evolutionary Tale

Researchers using Los Alamos' unique neutron-imaging and high-energy X-ray capabilities have exposed the inner structures of the fossil skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosauroid dinosaur nicknamed the Bisti Beast in the highest-resolution scan of tyrannosaur skull ever done. The results add a new piece to the puzzle of how these bone-crushing top predators evolved over millions of years.

Posted in: News, Imaging
Read More >>

New Dental Imaging Method Uses Squid Ink to Fish for Gum Disease

Squid ink might be a great ingredient to make black pasta, but it could also one day make getting checked for gum disease at the dentist less tedious and even painless. By combining squid ink with light and ultrasound, a team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed a new dental imaging method to examine a patient's gums that is non-invasive, more comprehensive, and more accurate than the state of the art.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Imaging, Patient Monitoring
Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.