News : Nanotechnology
Tiny Graphene Radios May Lead to Internet of Nano-Things

For wireless communication, we’re all stuck on the same traffic-clogged highway — it’s a section of the electromagnetic spectrum known as radio waves. Advancements have made the...

News : Electronics & Computers
Supersonic Spray Yields New Nanomaterial for Bendable, Wearable Electronics

A new, ultrathin film that is both transparent and highly conductive to electric current has been produced by a cheap and simple method devised by an international...

News : Medical
Microwaves Target Deep Tumors

Physicists at the University of Texas at Arlington have shown that using microwaves to activate photosensitive nanoparticles produces tissue-heating effects that ultimately lead to cell death within solid tumors. The new concept, which combines microwaves with photodynamic therapy, opens new avenues for targeting...

News : Electronics & Computers
Scientists Find Twisting 3-D Electron Raceway in Nanoscale Crystal Slices

Researchers have created an exotic 3-D racetrack for electrons in ultrathin slices of a nanomaterial they fabricated at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The international team of scientists from Berkeley Lab, UC Berkeley,...

News : Sensors/Data Acquisition
Glucose-Sensing Contact Lens Enables Noninvasive Testing

Blood testing is the standard option for checking glucose levels, but a new technology could allow noninvasive testing via a contact lens that samples glucose levels in tears. Glucose is a good target for optical sensing, and especially for what is known as surface-enhanced Raman...

News : Manufacturing & Prototyping
Nanoscale Sculpturing of Metals Can Improve Biocompatibility for Implants

How metals can be used depends particularly on the characteristics of their surfaces. A research team at Kiel University has discovered how they can change the surface properties without affecting the mechanical stability of the metals or changing the metal characteristics...

News : Aerospace
Morphing Nanotubes into Tougher Carbon for Aerospace

Rice University materials scientists are making nanodiamonds and other forms of carbon by smashing nanotubes against a target at high speeds. The process will enrich the knowledge of engineers who design structures that resist damage from high-speed impacts. The diamonds are the result of a...

News : Energy
Nanomaterial Could Speed Up Electric Vehicle Charging

A new material could one day speed up the charging process of electric cars and help increase their driving range. Researchers have combined a covalent organic framework (COF) – a strong, stiff polymer with an abundance of tiny pores suitable for storing energy – with a very conductive...

News : Materials
Advanced Spray-On Material Repels Water

A new spray-on material from engineers at The Australian National University (ANU) offers a more robust waterproofing capability than previous coatings. Combining two plastics, one tough and one flexible, the invention could eventually be used to protect mobile phones, de-ice airplane parts, or keep boat...

News : Materials
Plastic-Based Textile Leads to 'Cool' Clothes

A low-cost, plastic-based textile from Stanford University engineers could cool the body efficiently when woven into clothing.

News : Materials
Molecular Switch for Controlling Color

A collaboration of researchers from Kumamoto, Yamaguchi, and Osaka Universities in Japan have discovered a new method of drastically changing the color and fluorescence of a particular compound using only oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2) gases. The fully reversible reaction is environmentally friendly since it...

News : Electronics & Computers
Molecular Electronics Could Someday Replace Silicon Chips

Technion researchers have developed a method for growing carbon nanotubes that could lead to the day when molecular electronics replace the ubiquitous silicon chip as the building block of electronics.

News : Electronics & Computers
Engineered “Sand” May Help Cool Electronic Devices

Baratunde Cola would like to put sand into your computer. Not beach sand, but silicon dioxide nanoparticles coated with a high dielectric constant polymer to inexpensively provide improved cooling for increasingly power-hungry electronic devices.

News : Photonics/Optics
Optics Breakthrough Could Revamp Night Vision

A breakthrough by an Australian collaboration of researchers could make infrared technology easy-to-use and cheap, potentially saving millions of dollars in defense and other areas using sensing devices, and boosting applications of technology to a host of new areas, such as agriculture. Infra-red...

News : Electronics & Computers
Wild Mushrooms Support New Battery Anodes

Researchers at Purdue University have created electrodes from a species of wild fungus called Tyromyces fissilis. Carbon fibers derived from the sustainable source have been shown to outperform conventional graphite electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

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