Semiconductors & ICs

Choosing the Right High-Speed SerDes Technology for ADAS and Infotainment Systems

As infotainment and advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) become increasingly sophisticated, accurate and real-time data processing has become more critical for vehicles. The only technology that can manage the explosion of video, audio, and communications data fueling these applications are high-speed serial links. High bandwidth, performance, and reliability of these serial links will continue to be key requirements as the automotive industry advances toward fully autonomous cars. In this paper, we will examine how high-speed serial links enable next-generation vehicles.

Posted in: White Papers, Automotive, Semiconductors & ICs
Read More >>

A Semiconductor Breakthrough: Carbon Nanotubes Boost Thermoelectric Performance

In a report published in October, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNCTs) to advance the thermoelectric performance of organic semiconductors. The carbon nanotube thin films, they said, could ultimately be integrated into fabrics to convert waste heat into electricity or serve as a small power source.

Posted in: News, Semiconductors & ICs
Read More >>

Specialized Materials Meet Critical Packaging Needs in MEMS Devices

The unique requirements of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) call for specialized materials. Versatile epoxy adhesives are often capable of providing the necessary properties to ensure support and protection from thermal and mechanical shock, vibration, high acceleration, particles, and other physical damage. Download Master Bond’s white paper to find out how these materials are used and their benefits for MEMs applications.

Posted in: White Papers, Electronics, Materials, Semiconductors & ICs
Read More >>

Robotic Rubber ‘Skin’ Senses Temperatures. What’s Next?

A rubber “skin” developed at the University of Houston allows a robotic hand to sense the difference between hot and cold temperatures. The semiconductor material supports new applications in stretchable electronics, including medical implants, health monitors, and human-machine interfaces.

Posted in: News, Semiconductors & ICs
Read More >>

Single-Photon Emitter Holds Promise for Quantum Info-Processing

Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced the first known material capable of single-photon emission at room temperature and at telecommunications wavelengths. These carbon nanotube quantum light emitters may be important for optically-based quantum information processing and information security, while also being of significant interest for ultrasensitive sensing, metrology and imaging needs and as photon sources for fundamental advances in quantum optics studies.

Posted in: INSIDER, Photonics, Semiconductors & ICs
Read More >>

Shaper Design in CMOS for High Dynamic Range

Front-end electronics for capacitive sensors typically include a preamplifier followed by a filter. The preamplifier provides low-noise amplification of the signals induced in the sensor electrodes. The filter, by properly limiting the signal bandwidth, maximizes the Signal-to-Noise (S/N) ratio. Additionally, the filter limits the duration of the output signal associated with the measured event and, for those sensors where the induced signal is relatively slow, it maximizes the signal amplitude.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers, Semiconductors & ICs, Design processes, Amplifiers, Electronic equipment, Sensors and actuators, Amplifiers, Electronic equipment, Sensors and actuators, Noise, Noise
Read More >>

Perspiration Power: Biofuel Cell Reacts to Sweat

Engineers from the University of California – San Diego have developed stretchable fuel cells that extract energy from an often-unpleasant source: sweat. The flexible UCSD-developed devices are capable of powering wearables and electronics such as LEDs and Bluetooth radios.

Posted in: News, Energy, Energy Harvesting, Energy Storage, Semiconductors & ICs, Sensors
Read More >>

Researcher Sees the Power of Solar Glasses

New eyeglasses from Germany’s Karlsruhe Institute of Technology generate solar power. Featuring semitransparent organic solar cells, the eyewear powers a microprocessor and two small displays integrated into the solar glasses’ temples. In a Tech Briefs Q&A, one KIT researcher explains why the proof-of-concept is the first step to even smarter devices.

Posted in: News, Semiconductors & ICs
Read More >>

New Class of ‘Soft’ Semiconductors Could Transform HD Displays

A new type of semiconductor may be coming to a high-definition display near you. Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have shown that a class of semiconductor called halide perovskites can emit multiple, bright colors from a single nanowire at resolutions as small as 500 nanometers. The findings represent a clear challenge to quantum dot displays that rely upon traditional semiconductor nanocrystals to emit light. It could also influence the development of new applications in optoelectronics, photovoltaics, nanoscopic lasers, and ultrasensitive photodetectors, among others.

Posted in: INSIDER, Semiconductors & ICs
Read More >>

'Magic' Alloy Could Spur Next Generation of Solar Cells

In what could be a major step forward for a new generation of solar cells called "concentrator photovoltaics," University of Michigan researchers have developed a new semiconductor alloy that can capture the near-infrared light located on the leading edge of the visible light spectrum. Easier to manufacture and at least 25 percent less costly than previous formulations, it's believed to be the world's most cost-effective material that can capture near-infrared light—and is compatible with the gallium arsenide semiconductors often used in concentrator photovoltaics.

Posted in: INSIDER, Materials, Photonics, Semiconductors & ICs
Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.