Special Coverage

Soft Robot “Walks” on Any Terrain
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
Using Microwaves to Produce High-Quality Graphene
Transducer-Actuator Systems for On-Machine Measurements and Automatic Part Alignment
Wide-Area Surveillance Using HD LWIR Uncooled Sensors
Heavy Lift Wing in Ground (WIG) Cargo Flying Boat
Technique Provides Security for Multi-Robot Systems
Bringing New Vision to Laser Material Processing Systems
NASA Tests Lasers’ Ability to Transmit Data from Space
Converting from Hydraulic Cylinders to Electric Actuators
Automating Optimization and Design Tasks Across Disciplines

Gesture Recognition: How to Turn Any Object into a Remote Control

A new gesture-recognition technology from Lancaster University can make a remote control out of your coffee mug — or most everyday objects, for that matter.

Posted in: News, News, Cameras, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Imaging
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Sound-Off: Do Electric Vehicles Produce High-Frequency Noise?

Many structural factors contribute to automotive noise, whether the vehicle is electric or has an internal combustion engine. In a webinar this week titled, “The Art of NVH Attenuation,” an attendee asked Dr. Pranab Saha, a consultant and expert in acoustics, noise, and vibration control: “Do electric vehicles (EVs) produce unwanted noises at higher frequency than conventionally powered cars?”

Posted in: News, Automotive
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Robotic Rubber ‘Skin’ Senses Temperatures. What’s Next?

A rubber “skin” developed at the University of Houston allows a robotic hand to sense the difference between hot and cold temperatures. The semiconductor material supports new applications in stretchable electronics, including medical implants, health monitors, and human-machine interfaces.

Posted in: News, Materials, Automation, Robotics, Semiconductors & ICs
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Sound-Off: The Imaging Advantages of Blue Light vs. White Light

Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a non-contact optical method of measuring deformation and strain on a given material. Measurement accuracy, however, depends on contrast, illumination, and light intensity.

Posted in: News, Cameras, Imaging, Measuring Instruments, Monitoring, Test & Measurement
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The 2017 OEM Sensors Supplier Guide

The editors of September’s Sensor Technology magazine compiled a list of top sensor vendors, organized by product type. Explore this year’s OEM Sensors Supplier Guide.

Posted in: News, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors
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From the Earth to the Moon: How Robert Goddard Launched Present-Day Spaceflight

On a snowy day in 1926, a 44-year-old physicist named Robert Goddard went with his wife Esther and some colleagues to his Aunt Effie’s ranch in Auburn, Massachusetts. What happened next was not a typical day on the farm. The group tested the first liquid-fueled rocket.

Posted in: News, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Propulsion
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Sound-Off: Which Vehicle Power-Plant Choices Will Win in 2020?

Today's vehicles feature traditional internal combustion engines, hybrid, plugin, and electric drivetrains. A reader asks: "Which power-plant choice will take the lead in 2020?"

Posted in: News, Automotive, Power Transmission
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Introducing the 2017 OEM Photonics & Imaging Directory

Looking for new cameras, lasers, or optics? Our 2017 OEM Photonics & Imaging Directory, featured in the September issue of Tech Briefs, reviews essential vendors.

Posted in: News, Cameras, Imaging, Machine Vision, Fiber Optics, Lasers & Laser Systems, Optical Components, Optics, Photonics
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A Piezoelectric Highway? Engineers Take Another Test Drive

Researchers from Lancaster University are looking to pave the next generation of smart road surfaces — with piezoelectric ceramics. When embedded in road surfaces, the tiles convert vehicle vibration into electrical energy.

Posted in: News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Harvesting, Energy Storage, Renewable Energy, Thermoelectrics, Ceramics, Materials
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To Watch the Warehouse, Researchers Turn to Drones

Despite the growing use of wireless radio frequency ID (RFID) tags, lost inventory still costs warehouses billions of dollars every year. Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed an aerial way of supplementing the RFID technology: small, safe drones.

Posted in: News, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors
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