Special Coverage

Soft Robot “Walks” on Any Terrain
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
Using Microwaves to Produce High-Quality Graphene
Transducer-Actuator Systems for On-Machine Measurements and Automatic Part Alignment
Wide-Area Surveillance Using HD LWIR Uncooled Sensors
Heavy Lift Wing in Ground (WIG) Cargo Flying Boat
Technique Provides Security for Multi-Robot Systems
Bringing New Vision to Laser Material Processing Systems
NASA Tests Lasers’ Ability to Transmit Data from Space
Converting from Hydraulic Cylinders to Electric Actuators
Automating Optimization and Design Tasks Across Disciplines

Three Things Medical Device Designers Need to Know About UVC LEDs

The global infection control market is projected to reach $22 billion by 2022 with disinfection products, which would include UVC devices, representing the largest growth segment. UVC LEDs offer medical equipment designers an exciting new way to develop hand-held or portable disinfection devices to greatly enhance HAI prevention in a wide range of healthcare applications. Importantly, the design and operating flexibility of UVC LEDs means that these devices could be used during routine daily patient management and not limited to empty terminal room events.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Medical
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Wearable System Guides Visually Impaired Users

A new wearable system from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology will help blind users navigate through indoor environments.

Posted in: MDB, News, News, Imaging, Sensors
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Assessing brain bleeding in head injuries with new device

In a clinical trial conducted among adults in 11 hospitals, researchers have shown that a hand-held EEG device approved in 2016 by the U.S. FDA that is commercially available can quickly and with 97 percent accuracy rule out if a person with a head injury is likely to have brain bleeding and needs further evaluation and treatment.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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Giant shipworm could reveal clues about human medicine, bacterial infections

Northeastern professor Daniel Distel and his colleagues have discovered a dark, slithering 4-foot-long creature that dwells in the foul mud of a remote lagoon in the Philippines. They say studying the animal, a giant shipworm with pinkish siphons at one end and an eyeless head at the other, could add to our understanding of how bacteria cause infections and, in turn, how we might adapt to tolerate or even benefit from them.

Posted in: MDB, News, Medical
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New handheld fiber-optic probe brings endoscopic diagnosis of cancer closer to clinic

In an important step toward endoscopic diagnosis of cancer, researchers have developed a handheld fiber-optic probe that can be used to perform multiple nonlinear imaging techniques without the need for tissue staining. The new multimodal imaging probe uses an ultrafast laser to create nonlinear optical effects in tissue that can reveal cancer and other diseases.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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Cells grow more naturally in 'spaghetti'

The usual way of cultivating cells is to use a flat laboratory dish of glass. However, inside a human body, the cells do not grow on a flat surface but rather in three dimensions. This has lead researchers at Lund University in Sweden to develop a porous "spaghetti" of tissue-friendly polymers with cavities in which the cells can develop in a more natural way.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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Printed Electronics Primer: an Introduction to the Basics of Printed Electronics

This white paper provides an overview of how printed electronics (PE) can help you fit more functionality into smaller spaces, while maximizing cost efficiency. You will learn the basic terminology and gain an understanding of today’s PE industry, including prevalent technologies, materials and manufacturing processes.

Posted in: White Papers, Communications, Electronics & Computers, Medical
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Next-generation heart valve regenerates into heart-like tissue

The human heart beats approximately 35 million times every year, effectively pumping blood into the circulation via four different heart valves. Unfortunately, in over 4 million people each year, these delicate tissues malfunction due to birth defects, age-related deteriorations, and infections, causing cardiac valve disease.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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Laser printing with nanoparticles holds promise for medical research

Electronic devices that not only can be implanted in the human body but also completely dissolve on their own – known as bioresorbable electronics – are envisioned by many as one of medical technology's next frontiers. A new study by Missouri University of Science and Technology researchers suggests that a laser printing technique using nanoparticles could help unlock a more cost-effective approach to building sturdier and safer components.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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Process invented to make sustainable rubber and plastics

Synthetic rubber and plastics used for manufacturing tires, toys, and myriad other products are produced from butadiene, a molecule traditionally made from petroleum or natural gas. But those humanmade materials could get a lot greener soon, thanks to the ingenuity of a team of scientists from three U.S. research universities.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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