Special Coverage

NASA Supercomputer Simulations Reveal 'Noisy' Aerodynamics
Robotic Gripper Cleans Up Space Debris
Soft Robot “Walks” on Any Terrain
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
Using Microwaves to Produce High-Quality Graphene
Transducer-Actuator Systems for On-Machine Measurements and Automatic Part Alignment
Wide-Area Surveillance Using HD LWIR Uncooled Sensors
Heavy Lift Wing in Ground (WIG) Cargo Flying Boat
Technique Provides Security for Multi-Robot Systems
Bringing New Vision to Laser Material Processing Systems
NASA Tests Lasers’ Ability to Transmit Data from Space

New Dental Imaging Method Uses Squid Ink to Fish for Gum Disease

Squid ink might be a great ingredient to make black pasta, but it could also one day make getting checked for gum disease at the dentist less tedious and even painless. By combining squid ink with light and ultrasound, a team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed a new dental imaging method to examine a patient's gums that is non-invasive, more comprehensive, and more accurate than the state of the art.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Imaging, Patient Monitoring
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Future Smartwatches Could Sense Hand Movement Using Ultrasound imaging

New research has shown future wearable devices, such as smartwatches, could use ultrasound imaging to sense hand gestures. The research team is led by Professor Mike Fraser, Asier Marzo, and Jess McIntosh from the Bristol Interaction Group at the University of Bristol in the U.K., together with University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Imaging, Sensors
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Non-Invasive Imaging Predicts Cancer Malignancy

A new study by Osaka University scientists shows that non-labeling multiphoton microscopy (NL-MPM) can be used for quantitative imaging of cancer that is safe and requires no resection, fixation, or staining of tissues. It’s expected to simplify and reduce the time of cancer diagnosis.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Imaging, Patient Monitoring
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Creating the Future: A New Way to Join Arteries

A novel, pencil-sized device now provides surgeons with an alternative to traditional methods of suturing arteries. The Arterial Everter, Medical Category winner of the 2017 “Create the Future” Design Contest, will reduce operation times, according to the technology’s inventor.

Posted in: News, News, Medical, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy
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A Balancing Act: How Months in Space Impact Astronauts' Performance

When you arrive back on Earth after a year in space, you’re going to feel it.

NASA and Jacob Bloomberg, senior scientist in the Houston, TX- headquartered Johnson Space Center, have been trying to quantify exactly what those effects will be — and how 12 months of microgravity impact an astronaut’s ability to perform simple operational tasks like opening a hatch or climbing a ladder.

Posted in: News, Patient Monitoring, Monitoring
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Tissue Repair, With a Single Touch

Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and Ohio State’s College of Engineering have developed a new kind of TNT — a "Tissue Nanotransfection" device that generates specific cell types for treatment within a patient’s own body. The “cuff-link”-sized technology supports the repair or restoration of aging tissue, including organs, blood vessels, and nerve cells. Tech Briefs spoke with one of the TNT’s lead researchers.

Posted in: News, News, Implants & Prosthetics, Patient Monitoring, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy
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New 3D printing method promises superior medical implants for millions

For the millions of people every year who have or need medical devices implanted, a new advancement in 3D printing technology developed at the University of Florida promises significantly quicker implantation of devices that are stronger, less expensive, more flexible, and more comfortable than anything currently available.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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Study points way to better implantable medical devices

Medical devices implanted in the body for drug delivery, sensing, or tissue regeneration usually come under fire from the host's immune system. Defense cells work to isolate material they consider foreign to the body, building up a wall of dense scar tissue around the devices, which eventually become unable to perform their functions.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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Flexible glass made for tiny medical devices

Brigham Young University researchers have developed new glass technology that could add a new level of flexibility to the microscopic world of medical devices.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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Using Spider Silk, Surgeon Hits a Nerve

Christine Radtke, a Professor for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Austria’s MedUni Vienna/Vienna General Hospital, has 21 spiders. The silk obtained from the Tanzanian golden orb-weavers offers Radtke and her team a valuable material to repair nerve and tissue.

Posted in: News, News, Materials, Implants & Prosthetics
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