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Adhesion Reduction of Semiconductor Dicing Tape

Many semiconductor wafer processing techniques involve the fixing of a thin layer of dicing tape to a wafer during the final processing stages. To allow removal of the die from the tape, the adhesion properties of the tape may be reduced with exposure to high-intensity UV light.

Posted in: White Papers, Coatings & Adhesives

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3D Printing Materials: Choosing the Right Material for Your Application

3D printing has matured over the last decade, due in large part to the breadth of available materials. Additive manufacturing now offers many of the thermoplastics and metals found in traditional manufacturing. With so many options, choosing the right material for your application is crucial. Read the latest white paper from Stratasys Direct Manufacturing to learn what factors to consider when selecting your material.

Posted in: White Papers

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3D Printing of Aerospace Parts: A Real Solution with Real Benefits

Innovation in aerospace is accelerating, advancing frontiers at the component and product levels in manufacturing operations, rethinking supply chains and, in some cases, at the business model level. Parts can now be created with complex geometries and shapes that, in many cases, are impossible to create without 3D printing. Low aerospace volumes make 3D printing an attractive, lower-cost alternative to replace conventional CNC machining and other tooling processes for smaller-scale parts and finished assemblies. Aerospace innovators are embracing 3D printing beyond prototyping, and are aggressively pursuing new applications for the technology. This white paper describes how the aerospace industry can reap the many benefits of 3D printing to reduce expenses associated with time, waste, and productivity.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers

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Coming Soon - Simulation of Microfluidic Devices Using COMSOL

Modeling and simulation form a systematic framework for developing and optimizing microfluidic systems. Such simulations often involve coupling multiple physical effects such as single- and multi-phase flow, mixing, dispensing, heat transfer, species transport and diffusion, chemical reactions, surface tension and wetting, electrokinetic effects, and flow interaction with biological material.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

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Explosive Destruction System Begins Eliminating Chemical Weapons

The Explosive Destruction System (EDS), designed by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Army, has begun safely destroying stockpile chemical munitions.

Posted in: News

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Will airships be the future of "green" aviation?

A group of academics from the University of Lincoln, UK, believe airships may be the 'green' answer to the future growth of aviation . The Multibody Advanced Airship for Transport (MAAT) project, made up of eight nations and led by the Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia in Italy, is working to design a cruiser which can travel across the globe on a set route. Smaller feeder ships carrying people and goods would then be able to dock onto the cruiser while it is still moving. To provide sufficient electric power during the day, photovoltaic arrays, mounted on the upper airship surface, harvest sunlight. What do you think? Will airships be the future of "green" aviation?

Posted in: Question of the Week

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Researchers Develop Hybrid Supercapacitors

UCLA researchers have successfully combined two nanomaterials to create a new energy storage medium that combines the best qualities of batteries and supercapacitors.The new hybrid supercapacitor stores large amounts of energy, recharges quickly, and can last for more than 10,000 recharge cycles. The UCLA scientists also created a microsupercapacitor that is small enough to fit in wearable or implantable devices. Just one-fifth the thickness of a sheet of paper, it is capable of holding more than twice as much charge as a typical thin-film lithium battery.The new components combine laser-scribed graphene, or LSG — a material that can hold an electrical charge, is very conductive, and charges and recharges very quickly — with manganese dioxide, which is currently used in alkaline batteries. The nanomaterials can be fabricated without the need for extreme temperatures or the expensive “dry rooms” required to produce today’s supercapacitors.“Let’s say you wanted to put a small amount of electrical current into an adhesive bandage for drug release or healing assistance technology,” said professor Richard Kaner. “The microsupercapacitor is so thin you could put it inside the bandage to supply the current. You could also recharge it quickly and use it for a very long time.”The researchers found that the supercapacitor could quickly store electrical charge generated by a solar cell during the day, hold the charge until evening, and then power an LED overnight, showing promise for off-grid street lighting.SourceAlso: Read more Electronics & Computers tech briefs.

Posted in: News

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White Papers

Solar Electric Systems – Power Reliability
Sponsored by SunWize
Designing Ring Projections for Hermetic Sealing
Sponsored by Miyachi Unitek
Energy Chain® Cable Carriers: The Right Material for Any Application
Sponsored by igus
Internet of Things
Sponsored by HP
How to Maximize Temperature Measurement Accuracy
Sponsored by VTI Instruments
Determining an Effective Analog Sampling Rate
Sponsored by Sealevel

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