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Lightweight Internal Device to Measure Tension in Hollow- Braided Cordage
System, Apparatus, and Method for Pedal Control
Dust Tolerant Connectors
Foldable and Deployable Power Collection System
Iodine-Compatible Hall Effect Thruster
Development of a Novel Electrospinning System with Automated Positioning and Control Software
2016 Create The Future Design Contest Open For Entries
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Will security concerns prevent widespread adoption of wearables and IoT devices?

This week's Question: In the paper "Friend or Foe?: Your Wearable Devices Reveal Your Personal PIN" scientists from Binghamton University and the Stevens Institute of Technology combined data from embedded sensors in wearable technologies, such as smartwatches and fitness trackers, along with a computer algorithm to crack private PINs and passwords. By using data from “accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers inside the wearable technologies regardless of a hand’s pose,” the researchers could record a hand’s fine-grained movements. The researchers then used a “Backward PIN-sequence Inference Algorithm” to crack the codes.

Posted in: Question of the Week

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Researchers Develop Self-Healing, Shape-Changing Smart Material

Washington State University researchers have created a multi-functional smart material that changes shape when subjected to heat or light; the material then assembles and disassembles itself.

Posted in: News, Materials

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Coding and Computers Could Help Detect Explosives

The top image shows a typical reading from a mass spectrometer, where each line indicates the presence of a certain substance. The bottom image shows a reading from the new coded aperture, where researchers rely on computers to collapse the numerous lines into a brighter version of the image above. (Photo: Jeff Glass, Duke University) A modern twist on an old technology could soon help detect rogue methane leaks, hidden explosives and much more. A Duke University team is using software to dramatically improve the performance of chemical-sniffing mass spectrometers.

Posted in: News

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Engineers Use Cyborg Insects as Biorobotic Sensing Machines

Sensors placed on the insect monitor neural activity while they are freely moving, decoding the odorants present in their environment. (Photo: Baranidharan Raman) A team of engineers from Washington University in St. Louis is looking to capitalize on the sense of smell in locusts to create new biorobotic sensing systems that could be used in homeland security applications.

Posted in: News

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Researchers Improve Decontamination Criteria for Combat-Vehicle Coatings

U.S. Army combat vehicle coatings provide chemical warfare agent protection as well as camouflage and corrosion resistance. An ECBC research team provided the Army with a more accurate method for evaluating the protective value of coatings purchased from vendors. (Photo: ECBC Communications) When it comes to protecting warfighters from exposure to chemical agents that have contaminated combat vehicles, determining how much agent gets absorbed into the material matters. That's what researchers at the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) discovered and helped the Army fix.

Posted in: News

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Customized Masking Solutions Don’t Require Customized Masks

If you’re masking with conventional methods, you know the challenges associated with complex design configurations and need for reliable protection from aggressive chemical processes, high-temperature coatings, or surface treatment processes. Even minute gaps or voids in coverage can result in edge-lift and leakage that can significantly compromise protection and adversely impact your bottom line.

Posted in: White Papers, Materials

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Aerospace Fuel System Modeling On-Demand Webinar Series

This series takes you through the process of modeling a typical passenger aircraft.  We begin with creating a simple 1-D model in Flowmaster, looking at the placement and functions of components, then we go on to add complexities such as controls and then fuel venting and inerting systems, until we reach part 4 where we look at characterizing 3D components to import into our original Flowmaster model.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars

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