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Coming Soon - Developing Cutting Edge Lighter Than Air Vehicles at Aeros: The Role of Physics Based Simulation

Aeros is America's most innovative FAA-certified lighter than air vehicle manufacturing company and their products are used for both military and commercial applications. In this Webinar, Aeros will describe the business challenges of getting a successful lighter than air vehicle to market and approved by the regulator and the critical role that physics based simulation has played in this process.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

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Coming Soon - How to Select the Right Adhesive for Aerospace Applications

The selection process of an adhesive, coating, or potting compound can pose a few challenges for engineers. Some of these include adhesion, temperature and thermal cycling resistance, and handling and curing time. For certain aerospace applications, compounds may need to pass NASA low outgassing specification ASTM E595 or UL 94V-0 for flame retardancy, for example.

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New Vision Algorithm Enables Household Robots

Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory believe that household robots should take advantage of their mobility and their relatively static environments to make object recognition easier, by imaging objects from multiple perspectives before making judgments about their identity.Matching up the objects depicted in the different images, however, poses its own computational challenges.In a paper appearing in a forthcoming issue of the International Journal of Robotics Research, the MIT researchers show that a system using an off-the-shelf algorithm to aggregate different perspectives can recognize four times as many objects as one that uses a single perspective, while reducing the number of misidentifications.The team's new algorithm is 10 times as fast, making it much more practical for real-time deployment with household robots.SourceAlso: See other Software tech briefs.

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Coming Soon - Powdered Sample Handling Device

This invention consists of a powdered sample handling device for analytical instruments that places the powder in motion during analysis, using vibrations created at sonic or ultrasonic frequencies.

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Coming Soon - Modeling Batteries and Fuel Cells using COMSOL Multiphysics

Multiphysics simulation is a cost-effective solution that helps engineers and researchers optimize fuel cells, batteries, and other electrochemical energy extraction devices. This webinar will introduce methods for modeling polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), lithium-ion batteries, and general electrochemical systems with COMSOL Multiphysics and the Batteries & Fuel Cells Module.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars

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Are you optimistic about artificial intelligence?

This week's Question: In a BBC interview last year, renowned physicist, cosmologist, and author Stephen Hawking warned of the dangers of artificial intelligence. Hawking said AI "would take off on its own and re-design itself at an ever-increasing rate," passing the limited abilities of humans. A new study from Stanford University aims to understand the impacts that artificial intelligence will have on Earth. Leading thinkers from several institutions will begin a 100-year effort to study and anticipate how AI will influence how people work, live and play. "I'm very optimistic about the future and see great value ahead for humanity with advances in systems that can perceive, learn and reason," said Stanford alumnus and former president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Eric Horvitz, "However, it is difficult to anticipate all of the opportunities and issues, so we need to create an enduring process." What do you think? Are you optimistic about artificial intelligence?

Posted in: Question of the Week

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Researchers Build 3D 'Pop-Up' Silicon Structures

Exploiting mechanics principles similar to those found in children’s ‘pop-up’ books, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a unique process for geometrically transforming two dimensional (2D) micro/nanostructures into extended 3D layouts. Complex, 3D micro/nanostructures are ubiquitous in biology, where they provide essential functions in even the most basic forms of life. Similar design strategies have great potential for use in a wide variety of man-made systems, from biomedical devices to microelectromechanical components, photonics and optoelectronics, metamaterials, electronics, and energy storage. “Conventional 3D printing technologies are fantastic, but none offers the ability to build microstructures that embed high performance semiconductors, such as silicon,” explained John Rogers, a Swanlund Chair and professor of materials science and engineering at Illinois. “We have presented a remarkably simple route to 3D that starts with planar precursor structures formed in nearly any type of material, including the most advanced ones used in photonics and electronics. A stretched, soft substrate imparts forces at precisely defined locations across such a structure to initiate controlled buckling processes that induce rapid, large-area extension into the third dimension. The result transforms the planar materials into well-defined, 3D frameworks with broad geometric diversity. SourceAlso: Learn about Ohmic Contact to N- and P-Type Silicon Carbide.

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