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Self-Healing Wire Insulation
Thermomechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Response
Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beams
High Field Superconducting Magnets
Active Response Gravity Offload and Method
Strat-X
Sonar Inspection Robot System
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Smart NVH Solutions for Next-Generation Brake Design

In Conjunction with SAE Brake noise is one of the most frequent complaints from car owners. Brake engineers have spent significant time addressing consumer complaints of rattles, groans, and squeals.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars

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New Fabric Uses Sun to Power Devices

A new fabric developed at Georgia Institute of Technology uses sunlight and motion to harvest energy. Combining the two types of electricity generation into one textile paves the way for creating garments that could provide their own source of energy to power devices such as smartphones or global positioning systems.

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Reticulated Foams Expand The Boundaries Of Cellular Solids

Ideally suited for high-tech applications, reticulated foams of ceramic or metal provide industry as well as the research community with an extraordinarily versatile material form that can be engineered for particular properties and tailored for specific applications. The interconnected lattice of continuous ligaments within the cellular structure provides greater strength than shorter fibers and also ensures uniform material characteristics throughout the structure.

Posted in: White Papers, Defense, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials

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Applying IBM Continuous Engineering at CMC Electronics

Innovative and high-quality software is a key driver for business success in the aerospace industry. To remain competitive, quality must be built into all aspects of safety-critical products. In fact, this is a key requirement in any safety critical application under the aerospace DO-178C standard. CMC Electronics, a Canadian aerospace solutions supplier, leveraged the IBM Continuous Engineering solution to improve quality of its software components by applying model based testing with Rational Rhapsody and Test Conductor. Through the use of the IBM Continuous engineering solution and model based testing, CMC Electronics engineers have the ability to seamlessly integrate unit, integration, and HW/SW integration testing into their safety-critical model based development process.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars

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Nanomaterial Could Speed Up Electric Vehicle Charging

A new nanomaterial acts as both battery and supercapacitor. A conductive polymer (green) formed inside the small holes of a hexagonal framework (red and blue) works with the framework to store electrical energy. (William Dichtel, Northwestern University) A new material could one day speed up the charging process of electric cars and help increase their driving range. Researchers have combined a covalent organic framework (COF) – a strong, stiff polymer with an abundance of tiny pores suitable for storing energy – with a very conductive material to create the first modified redox-active COF that closes the gap with other older, porous, carbon-based electrodes.

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New Radio Technology Extends Mobile Device Battery Life

UMass Amherst professor Deepak Ganesan. University of Massachusetts Amherst professors introduced a new radio technology that allows small mobile devices to take advantage of battery power in larger devices nearby for communication. The Braidio, or braid of radios, can offload energy to larger devices nearby and, in effect, make both device size and battery consumption proportional to the size of battery.

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Flywheel Technology Could Save Power for Light Rail Transit

UAlberta mechanical engineering professors Marc Secanell (left) and Pierre Mertiny demonstrated that the use of flywheels on light rail transit can produce big savings in power and cost. University of Alberta mechanical engineering professors are making an old technology new again by using flywheel technology to assist light rail transit (LRT) in Edmonton. They examined the possibility of using flywheel technology to store energy generated when the city’s LRT trains decelerate and stop. Trains such as the LRT are designed with so-called dynamic braking, using traction motors on the train’s wheels for smooth stops. But the deceleration generates energy, which needs to go somewhere.

Posted in: News

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