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3D Measurement and Visualization of Displacement and Strain Fields

The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed a metrology workbench for the measurement and visualization of displacement and strain fields in three dimensions. The workbench uses two or more cameras to image a specimen, and includes custom software that implements the 3D Meshless Random Grid method.

Posted in: Briefs, Test & Measurement

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Eddy Current Probe for Surface and Sub-Surface Inspection

This technology can be used in aerospace, manufacturing, materials, and energy applications.NASA's Langley Research Center has developed a novel probe for eddy current sensor applications that improves detection depth and measurement resolution. Although the use of anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensors in eddy current probes to improve sensitivity at low frequencies and increase the detection depth is known, the high-frequency sensitivity and small size of these sensors is less explored. This new probe incorporates two induction sources (i.e., one high-frequency and one low-frequency) and an AMR sensor; the result is improved resolution in near-surface material characterization, combined with simultaneous deep-flaw detection. Addition of a second high-frequency induction source, oriented to produce a magnetic field orthogonal to the first, allows for near-surface anomaly detection in two dimensions.

Posted in: Briefs, Sensors

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Damage Detection System for Flat Surfaces

This multidimensional system detects damage to surfaces and vessels.NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) seeks to license its Multidimensional Damage Detection System for Flat Surfaces technology. The ability to detect damage to composite surfaces can be crucial, especially when those surfaces are enclosing a sealed environment that sustains human life and/or critical equipment or materials. Minor damage caused by foreign objects can, over time, eventually compromise the structural shell resulting in loss of life and/or destruction of equipment or material. The capability to detect and precisely locate damage to protective surfaces enables technicians to prognosticate the expected lifetime of the composite system, as well as to initiate repairs when needed to prevent catastrophic failure or to extend the service life of the structure.

Posted in: Briefs, Composites, Materials, Sensors

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Wireless Sensing System Using Open-Circuit, Electrically Conductive Spiral-Trace Sensor

This low-profile inductance-capacitance sensor is suitable for small packaging.NASA Langley Research Center researchers have developed a wireless, low-profile sensor that uses a magnetic field response measurement acquisition system to provide power to the sensor and to acquire physical property measurements from it. Unique to this sensor is the shape of the electrical trace that eliminates the need for separate inductance, capacitance, and connection circuitry. This feature gives the sensor a smaller circuit footprint to enable a smaller, flexible, and easy-to-fabricate sensor package. The shape of the electrical trace can be readily modified to sense different physical properties. Also, arranging multiple low-profile sensors together can permit the wireless data acquisition system to read the responses from all the sensors by powering just one of them.

Posted in: Briefs, Sensors

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Variable Permeability Magnetometer Systems and Methods for Aerospace Applications

This technology exploits the varying permeability of a magnetic material with ambient magnetic fields.NASA's Langley Research Center has developed a magnetometer that takes advantage of the unique variable permeability properties of Metglas 2714A magnetic material. By measuring directly the inductive reactance of a simple right circular cylindrical search coil through the application of current from a high-output-impedance current source driven with a 10-kHz sinusoidal voltage, a magnetic field sensor having a 700-Hz bandwidth, good linearity, and excellent noise performance with sensitivity at least as good as the 0.1 nTesla range was produced.

Posted in: Briefs, Sensors

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Methods for Intercalating and Exfoliating Hexagonal Boron Nitride

Innovators at NASA's Glenn Research Center have developed a number of materials and methods to optimize the performance of nanomaterials by making them tougher, more resistant, and easier to process. Glenn's scientists are generating critical improvements at all stages of nanomaterial production, from finding new ways to produce nanomaterials, to purifying them to work more effectively with advanced composites, to devising innovative techniques to incorporate them into matrices, veils, and coatings. These advances can be used to deposit protective coatings for textile-based composite materials, layer carbon nanotubes to add reinforcement, upgrade the properties of carbon ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), and integrate nanomaterial fibers into polymer matrix composites (PMCs). The field of nanomaterials is expanding rapidly, and NASA's Glenn Research Center is just as rapidly creating newer and better ways to deploy nanomaterials in industry and research.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials

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Method for Fabricating Diamond-Dispersed, Fiber-Reinforced Composite Coating on Low-Temperature Sliding Thrust Bearing Interfaces

Innovators at NASA's Glenn Research Center have developed a method for fabricating a fiber-reinforced diamond composite coating on the surfaces of sliding thrust bearings at low and cryogenic temperatures. The innovative composite coating is a mixture of diamond particles, organic chemicals, and fibers or fabrics. The diamond particles provide high hardness, and the fibers and binding matrix provide high-fracture toughness. Glenn's fabrication method can be tailored to meet a range of performance requirements for lightweight, low-temperature sliding thrust bearing applications. For example, the volume fraction of diamond particles can be increased to enhance the hardness of the composite coating, or the volume fraction of binding matrix can be increased to enhance its crack or fracture resistance. Glenn's method offers a diamond composite coating that is more cost-effective, wear-resistant, and fracture-tough than existing alternatives.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials

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