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Researchers Store Digital Data in DNA

Researchers from the University of Washington and Microsoft have stored digital images in DNA. The team of computer scientists and electrical engineers has detailed one of the first complete systems to encode, hold, and retrieve digital data using the molecules, which can store information millions of times more compactly than current archival technologies.

Posted in: News

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Product of the Month: April 2016

FLIR Systems, Wilsonville, OR, announced the identiFINDER® R200 handheld radiation detector that delivers American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N42.48-compliant identification and weighs less than one pound. The wearable detector provides continuous radiation monitoring without any user interaction. The detector combines FLIR's Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) technology with a Cesium Iodide (CsI) detector to provide high-resolution identification so the user can quickly determine whether a gamma radiation source is a true threat or a benign source from medical patients, normal occurring radiation, or industrial use. The detector utilizes Bluetooth® and Web server technologies, and features a OneTouch Reachback™ feature that provides the wearer with large-scale situational awareness, and enables instant notifications to help improve communications with command and control.

Posted in: Products

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Are cars set to be the next 'ultimate mobile device'?

This week's Question: As companies like Google and Apple lead self-driving car efforts, Hyundai Motors America CEO David Zuchowski expects the bridge between Silicon Valley and auto companies to narrow. In a recent interview with CNBC, Zuchowski suggested cars could replace mobile phones as the next big smart device. The CEO expects alliances to form between automakers — potential "hardware builders" — and technology companies that supply the software. "[Consumers] want an Apple experience," Zuchowski told CNBC. "The car is the ultimate mobile device, right?" What do you think? Are cars set to be the next 'ultimate mobile device'?    

Posted in: Question of the Week

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NASA Measures Raindrop Sizes from Space

For the first time, scientists have three-dimensional snapshots of raindrops and snowflakes around the world, thanks to the joint NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. With the new global data on raindrop and snowflake sizes, scientists can improve rainfall estimates from satellite data and numerical weather forecast models.

Posted in: News, Measuring Instruments, Monitoring

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Extensible Data Gateway Environment (EDGE)

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California The NASA Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) is NASA’s designated data center for information relevant to the physical state of the ocean. Its core datamanagement and workflow system, Data Management and Archive System (DMAS), is responsible for processing hundreds of thousands of data products each day, around the clock. Its inventory captures over 800 datasets, several million granules, and millions of files. PO.DAAC is in need of a solution to help users quickly identify the relevant oceanographic data artifact. It also needs to export metadata according to the ISO-19115, FGDC, and GCMD specifications. Developing such a solution on top of its Oracle database has several issues. First, it is difficult to maintain since SQL needs to be updated when a schema changes or when new search criteria is needed. Second, multi-table joins yield poor performance. Third, query performance can be improved with additional indexes, but performance is negatively impacted on updates. Fourth, exposing the operational database as the direct backend to a publicly accessible service layer would subject Oracle to a Denial of Service (DoS) attack, which could halt the already very busy DMAS operation environment.

Posted in: Briefs, Data Acquisition

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Flight Test Maneuvers for Efficient Aerodynamic Modeling

Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia Flight testing is expensive. It is therefore important that necessary flight data be collected in the most efficient manner possible. Inputs traditionally used for flight test maneuvers to collect aircraft stability and control data include doublets, impulses (stick raps), multisteps, and frequency sweeps. All of these input types are designed for single-axis response, although often the inputs are applied sequentially to different controls to collect multi-axis data.

Posted in: Briefs, Data Acquisition

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JPL CO2 Virtual Science Data Environment (VSDE)

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California The JPL CO2 Virtual Science Data Environment (VSDE) (http://co2.jpl.nasa.gov) is a comprehensive effort to bring together the models, data, and tools necessary for atmospheric CO2 research. The VSDE site is designed to provide streamlined Web-based discovery and access to multiple global and regional carbon dioxide data sets. Furthermore, this site provides tools for conversion, manipulation, and transformation of the data to facilitate research.

Posted in: Briefs, Data Acquisition

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