Defense

Forging as a Viable Alternative to 3D Printing of Non-Ferrous Metal Parts

3D printing is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology used to build objects layer-by-layer directly from digital data. It has surged in popularity in recent years because it enables fast and flexible product design and prototyping, and can be used to produce small numbers of parts cost-effectively, and create complex parts that are difficult or impossible to make otherwise.

Posted in: White Papers, Aeronautics, Defense, Manufacturing & Prototyping

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Electropolishing Prepares/Pre-Cleans Parts Properly Prior To Penetrant Testing

It is common, especially in the aerospace industry, for parts that are fracture critical to be Liquid Penetrant Inspected (LPI) prior to installation. Also known as Dye Penetrant Inspection (DPI) or simply Penetrant Testing (PT), this method is used to detect micro-cracks or other defects that could serve as an initiation site for failure. In order to properly execute a penetrant test, the surface of a metal part must be thoroughly clean of any debris, smeared metal, or any amorphous layer that may be hiding a hairline crack thus yielding a false reading.

Posted in: White Papers, Aeronautics, Defense, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials

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Tech-Clarity Perspective: Reducing Non-Value Added Work in Engineering

Mid-Size manufacturers in aerospace and defense continually seek ways to improve competitiveness. Removing inefficient systems and finding ways for engineers to remove non-value added tasks frees up time to focus on innovation, saving both time and money. In the Tech Clarity whitepaper, “Reducing Non-Value Added Work in Engineering,” founder and president of analyst firm Tech Clarity, Jim Brown, shares survey results from over 250 manufacturers. The Tech Clarity survey identifies the efficiency traits of industry top performers. The paper analyzes the results and ways to streamline and improve processes to stay ahead of the competition in a global competitive environment. Download now to learn more.

Posted in: White Papers, Aerospace, Defense, Manufacturing & Prototyping

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Integrated Epoxy Feedthroughs Improve Fuel Pump Reliability

Of all the design decisions that affect the operation of an in-tank fuel pump, the way you seal the pump housing may top the list. A bad seal will allow liquid fuel to work its way into the housing, which will eventually corrode the electronics and potentially cause a risk of fire.

Posted in: White Papers, Aeronautics, Defense, Mechanical Components

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Hermetic Feedthroughs Safeguard Mission-Critical Electronics

Experts specializing in electronics failure analysis can list a host of reasons for various malfunctions, but one of the most common causes is simple moisture. Because water and electronics do not mix well, several strategies exist to protect mission-critical components from moisture and condensation. One of the most successful methods of protecting key components from water hazards involves hermetically sealed electronics cavities—enabled by moisture-blocking component assemblies such as hermetic feedthrough technology.

Posted in: White Papers, Aerospace, Communications, Defense

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The Advantages of LWIR SLS Thermal Cameras

A relatively new type of photon detector material for infrared cameras offers a solution for scientists and engineers who need to record fast thermal transients or capture crisp still images of high speed objects or events. This material, called Type II Strained Layer Superlattice, or SLS, can match or exceed most of the performance of analogous detector materials such as indium antimonide (InSb) or mercury cadmium telluride (MCT). This article compares LWIR SLS detectors to MWIR InSb and LWIR MCT detectors, with specific attention to their integration times, temperature ranges, filtering needs, and uniformity.

Posted in: White Papers, Aeronautics, Defense, Electronics & Computers

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The Future of Exploration Starts With 3D Printing

Last year, engineers at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, tested an additive manufacturing process that is being used to make some of the parts for NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), more efficiently and affordably without compromising performance and safety. Selective laser melting (SLM) is a 3D printing process used to create complex parts for the engine and other components of the rocket. Four RS-25 engines and two solid rocket boosters will power the core stage of the SLS.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Defense

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