Electronic Components
Wearable Nanowire Sensors Monitor Electrophysiological Signals
Posted in Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Sensors, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Semiconductors & ICs, Nanotechnology, News on Wednesday, 21 January 2015
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new, wearable sensor that uses silver nanowires to monitor electrophysiological signals, such as electrocardiography (EKG) or electromyography (EMG). The new sensor is as accurate as the “wet electrode” sensors used in hospitals, but can be used for long-term monitoring and when a patient is moving.
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Technology Diagnoses Brain Damage from Concussions, Strokes, and Dementia
Posted in Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Photonics, Fiber Optics, Optics, Medical, Diagnostics, Test & Measurement, Measuring Instruments, Semiconductors & ICs, News on Thursday, 08 January 2015
New optical diagnostic technology developed at Tufts University School of Engineering promises new ways to identify and monitor brain damage resulting from traumatic injury, stroke, or vascular dementia in real time and without invasive procedures.
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15 Questions to Ask About Circuit Protection for Wearable Electronics
Posted in Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Power Management, Articles on Thursday, 01 January 2015
Have you attended an electronics or design tradeshow lately? Have you visited a big-box retailer or browsed an online electronics vendor? If so, you’ve probably seen many examples of wearable technology, including smart glasses, clothing, wristwear, footwear, neckwear, and headbands. Wearable computing is one of the hottest consumer electronics trends on the market, with global sales expected to grow from $14 billion in 2014 to over $70 billion in 2024, according to IDTechEx.
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SlimStack™ SSB6 SMT Micro Connectors
Posted in Electronic Components, Board-Level Electronics, Electronics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Joining & Assembly, Medical, MEMs, Products, MDB on Thursday, 01 January 2015
Molex, Inc., Lisle, IL, announces the launch of its new SlimStack™ SSB6 SMT microminiature board-to-board connectors. With an ultra-low profile (0.35 mm pitch) and compact size (0.60 mm height x 2.00 mm width, when mated), SlimStack SSB6 connectors are ideal for saving space in the compact packaging of a wide range of surgical, therapeutic, and monitoring medical devices.
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Hospital-Grade Standards for Power Cords and Other Power System Components for Global Markets
Posted in Electronic Components, Power Supplies, Power Management, FDA Compliance/Regulatory Affairs, Medical, Features, MDB on Thursday, 01 January 2015
While a number of countries have standards in regards to overall medical equipment, a few countries have related component requirements (e.g. plugs and cords). For the countries that do have hospital-grade or medical application standards on components, it is important to know what the requirements are so as to comply with that country or region’s rules.
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3D-Printed Contact Lens Combines Plastics and Electronics
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, News, MDB on Thursday, 18 December 2014
An interdisciplinary team of engineers at Princeton University has embedded tiny light-emitting diodes (LEDs) into a standard contact lens, allowing the device to project beams of colored light. While the lens is not designed for actual use, especially since it requires an external power supply, the team created the device to demonstrate its ability to 3D print electronics into complex shapes and materials.
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Wireless Brain Sensing Untethers Subjects
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Sensors, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Wednesday, 17 December 2014
Scientists at Brown University, Providence, RI, say that a new wireless brain-sensing system will allow them to acquire high-fidelity neural data to advance neuroscience that cannot be accomplished with current sensors that tie subjects to cabled computer connections for analysis. Their results show that the technology transmitted data-rich, neuroscientifically meaningful signals from animal models as they slept, woke, and exercised.
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