Electronics
3D-Printed Contact Lens Combines Plastics and Electronics
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, News, MDB on Thursday, 18 December 2014
An interdisciplinary team of engineers at Princeton University has embedded tiny light-emitting diodes (LEDs) into a standard contact lens, allowing the device to project beams of colored light. While the lens is not designed for actual use, especially since it requires an external power supply, the team created the device to demonstrate its ability to 3D print electronics into complex shapes and materials.
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Wireless Brain Sensing Untethers Subjects
Posted in Electronic Components, Electronics, Sensors, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Wednesday, 17 December 2014
Scientists at Brown University, Providence, RI, say that a new wireless brain-sensing system will allow them to acquire high-fidelity neural data to advance neuroscience that cannot be accomplished with current sensors that tie subjects to cabled computer connections for analysis. Their results show that the technology transmitted data-rich, neuroscientifically meaningful signals from animal models as they slept, woke, and exercised.
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Developing a Sonar-Assisted Device for the Blind
Posted in Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Electronics, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Wireless, News, MDB on Thursday, 11 December 2014
At Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, a biology professor researching echolocation in bats teamed up with an associate professor of computer science and an interdisciplinary team of students to develop a device that can help the visually impaired navigate better. Their research focused on developing a device that could be worn like a watch by a visually-impaired person as a supplement to other aids like a cane or guide dog.
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Heat-Conducting Plastic Dissipates Ten Times Better
Posted in Thermal Management, Electronics, Materials, Composites, Plastics, Medical, News, MDB on Monday, 08 December 2014
Engineers at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, have developed a plastic blend that, they say, can dissipate heat up to 10 times better than its conventional counterparts. While plastics are inexpensive, lightweight, and flexible, they tend to restrict the flow of heat, so their use has been limited in technologies like computers, smartphones, and other devices. This new research could lead to light, versatile, metal-replacement materials for more powerful electronics.
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Printing Electrical Components on Paper
Posted in Electronics, Medical, Drug Delivery & Fluid Handling, Patient Monitoring, Diagnostics, News, MDB on Friday, 05 December 2014
Seeking a way to print technology, improve device portability, and lower the cost of electronics, a team of engineers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, led by Assistant Professor Anming Hu, has discovered a way to print circuits on paper.
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NASA's Hot 100 Technologies: Electrical/Electronics
Posted in Electronics, Techs for License, Articles on Monday, 01 December 2014

High-Field Superconducting Magnets

This technology represents a significant improvement over commercial state-of-the-art magnets. These superconducting magnets are very versatile and can be used in a number of applications requiring magnetic fields at low temperature, such as in MRI machines, mass spectrometers, and particle accelerators.
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Trimming Wiring Harnesses Becomes Design Focus
Posted in Electronics, Aerospace, Defense, Articles, DTB on Monday, 01 December 2014
Wires and cables help design teams add electronic features and functions, but networks and wiring harnesses add a fair amount of weight while their connections can be the cause of failures. That’s prompting developers to examine ways to reduce the size and weight of wires and cables. Read more at http://articles.sae.org/13419.
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