Thermal Management
Custom 19” Fan Tray
Posted in Products, Thermal Management, Consumer Product Manufacturing on Wednesday, 01 April 2015
Verotec (Derry, NH) recently custom designed intelligent fan trays for a major defence project. The 19-inch rackmounted 1U trays have six fans, strategically located within the tray to maximise the cooling of critical elements of the electronic system located above the fan tray. Key issues for the fan tray design were noise levels, current consumption and reliability. A custom control board sequentially powers up each of the fans in order of importance to minimise initial inrush current. An embedded microprocessor controls fan speed using PWM technology. Reliability is critical, so three separate events will trigger a warning signal: if power is lost to the fan tray, if the controller board itself develops a fault or if the speed of any fan falls below 20% of maximum. The fan cooling the main processor board is deemed to be a critical component, so if its speed falls below 20% the relay latches into the alarm position. If triggered by any of the other five fans, the alarm relay will re-energise when the speed increases above the 20% threshold. For Free Info Visit
Thermal Management Solutions for Medical Electronics
Posted in Features, Electronics, Thermal Management on Wednesday, 01 April 2015
Electronic devices used in the medical industry have thermal management needs similar to those in other fields. Their electronics must stay cool enough to run continuously and correctly within their operating temperature range. Sound thermal management allows excess heat to be efficiently moved, spread, and dissipated. The result is improved system reliability and service life while, in many cases, it also helps designers reduce device package size, weight, energy consumption, and noise.
Self-Diagnostic Accelerometer Field Programmable Gate Array
Posted in Briefs, TSP, Power Supplies, Thermal Management, Sensors on Sunday, 01 March 2015
The system could be utilized as a portable and temporarily installed diagnostic system. John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio The development of the self-diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) is important to both reducing the in-flight shutdowns (IFSD) rate — and hence reducing the rate at which this component failure type can put an aircraft in jeopardy — and also as a critical enabling technology for future automated malfunction diagnostic systems. Critical sensors, such as engine sensors, are inaccessible to the operator during typical operation due to safety concerns and enclosed environment. The SDA can diagnose the sensor in-flight and remotely with minimal interference with the typical operation of the sensor. The SDA system utilizes programmed health algorithms that can automatically determine the health, therefore increasing the precision in diagnosing sensor faults by removing the erroneous perspective and opinions of a human operator. The health of the sensor could also be determined immediately, which would remove its erroneous effect on a system that depends on the sensor.
Capacitively Coupled, High-Voltage Current Sensing for Extreme Environments
Posted in Briefs, TSP, Electronic Components, Power Supplies, Thermal Management, Sensors on Sunday, 01 March 2015
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Wide-temperature and extreme-environment electronics are crucial to future missions. These missions will not have the weight and power budget for heavy harnesses and large, inefficient warm boxes. In addition, extreme-environment electronics, by their inherent nature, allow operation next to sensors in the ambient environment, reducing noise and improving precision over the warm-box-based systems employed today.
Heat-Conducting Plastic Dissipates Ten Times Better
Posted in News, Electronics, Thermal Management, Composites, Plastics on Monday, 08 December 2014
Engineers at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, have developed a plastic blend that, they say, can dissipate heat up to 10 times better than its conventional counterparts. While plastics are inexpensive, lightweight, and flexible, they tend to restrict the flow of heat, so their use has been limited in technologies like computers, smartphones, and other devices. This new research could lead to light, versatile, metal-replacement materials for more powerful electronics.
Unmanned Ocean Drone
Posted in Application Briefs, Thermal Management, Data Acquisition on Monday, 01 December 2014
Liquid Robotics
Sunnyvale, CA
Accurately forecasting weather conditions and currents prior to mission deployment is an invaluable intelligence tool for the warfighter. Being able to accurately predict a Category-5 typhoon or hurricane, instead of a tropical storm, also saves lives, saves property, and saves time in evacuations. The Liquid Robotics' Wave Glider®, a surfboard-sized ocean drone filled with sensors, computers, and communications equipment, can survive a Category-5 typhoon while continuously collecting and transmitting meteorological and oceanographic data. Previously this type of data was unobtainable because it was too risky to send manned ships out in the middle of a hurricane/typhoon; buoys can become severely damaged or come off their moorings in such conditions; and satellites have difficulty seeing through the dense cloud cover.
A Graphene-Metal Sandwich Could Improve Electronics
Posted in News, Electronic Components, Electronics, Thermal Management, Coatings & Adhesives, Metals on Thursday, 20 March 2014
Researchers have discovered that creating a graphene-copper-graphene “sandwich” enhances copper’s heat conducting properties, which could help in shrinking electronics. Engineers at the University of California, Riverside, and the University of Manchester, UK, in collaboration, found that adding a layer of graphene, a one-atom thick material on each side of a copper film increased heat conducting properties by up to 24 percent.