Electronics & Computers

Using a Multicast File Transfer Protocol to Update the Firmware of Multiple Embedded Devices Simultaneously

This method minimizes the amount of time and network bandwidth required to update the firmware in all smart sensor devices. John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida Smart sensors for measuring temperature and pressure have been developed as part of the Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance (AGSM) project. The sensors have flash memory for storing firmware, calibration data, and configuration information. In anticipation of the sensors being installed at multiple locations (possibly numbering in the hundreds) around the Kennedy Space Center, a method was devised to update the firmware of many sensors quickly and easily.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Software, Briefs

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Model of Radiation Effects on Electronics (MREE)

Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama An updated software model has been developed for predicting the single-event effect (SEE) rates in circuit designs as they are being designed. This tool will be used for estimating the frequency of the various SEEs, such as logic upsets and circuit latch-up. It may also be used to estimate the total radiation dose effects to microelectronic devices operated in the natural space radiation environment or in ionizing radiation test environments.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Software, Briefs

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Accurate Finite Element Simulation of Conductors

Simulation of electromagnetic systems relies on the accurate and efficient representation of electrical conductors and coils. This whitepaper reviews the ways conductors can be represented using the industry leading Opera Simulation Software Suite from Cobham. The methods explored include various bulk approximations useful for multi-turn windings as well as explicit methods to include current redistribution due to proximity, geometry and skin effects.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, White Papers

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Electronic Noses Detect Chemical Warfare Gases

Researchers at the Polytechnic University of Valencia have developed a prototype electronic "nose" for the detection of chemical warfare gases, mainly nerve gas, such as Sarin, Soman, and Tabun.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Electronics, Sensors, Detectors, Data Acquisition, Defense, News

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Prosthetic Arm Controlled by Imagining a Motion

Controlling a prosthetic arm by just imagining a motion may be possible through the work of Mexican scientists at the Centre for Research and Advanced Studies. First, it is necessary to know if there is a memory pattern in the amputee's brain in order to know how the arm moved. The pattern is then translated to instructions for the prosthesis.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Electronics, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, News

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NASA Tests Robot Swarms for Autonomous Movement

NASA engineers and interns are testing a group of robots and related software that will show whether it's possible for autonomous machines to scurry about an alien world such as the Moon, searching for and gathering resources just as an ant colony does.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Motion Control, Software, Communications, Wireless, Machinery & Automation, Robotics, RF & Microwave Electronics, Antennas, News

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Water Splitter Runs on AAA Battery

Scientists at Stanford University have developed a low-cost, emissions-free device that uses an ordinary AAA battery to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis.  The battery sends an electric current through two electrodes that split liquid water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. Unlike other water splitters that use precious-metal catalysts, the electrodes in the Stanford device are made of inexpensive and abundant nickel and iron.In addition to producing hydrogen, the novel water splitter could be used to make chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide, an important industrial chemical. Splitting water to make hydrogen requires no fossil fuels and emits no greenhouse gases. But scientists have yet to develop an affordable, active water splitter with catalysts capable of working at industrial scales."It's been a constant pursuit for decades to make low-cost electrocatalysts with high activity and long durability," said Stanford University Professor Hongjie Dai. "When we found out that a nickel-based catalyst is as effective as platinum, it came as a complete surprise."SourceAlso: Learn about a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell.

Posted in: Batteries, Electronics & Computers, Power Management, Alternative Fuels, Green Design & Manufacturing, Materials, Metals, Energy, News

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