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Self-Healing Wire Insulation
Thermomechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Response
Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beams
High Field Superconducting Magnets
Active Response Gravity Offload and Method
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Sonar Inspection Robot System
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Small Implanted Device Could Improve Breast Cancer Survival

A small scaffold device is designed to attract breast cancer cells. (University of Michigan College of Engineering) A small device implanted under the skin can improve breast cancer survival by catching cancer cells. The implantable scaffold device is made of FDA-approved material commonly used in sutures and wound dressings. It’s biodegradable and can last up to two years within a patient.

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Advanced Lightweighting Composite Process for Automotive Mass Production

In conjunction with SAE With growing demand for lighter, more fuel-efficient vehicles, the automotive industry has turned to materials suppliers to help find answers and provide new and innovative materials that can deliver solutions to the most challenging of applications. This 60-minute Webinar examines the new Direct Fluid Compression Molding Process (DFCM) and how it answers today’s demands and takes the next step toward massed produced composite automotive parts.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars

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Will you watch drone racing?

This week's Question: The Drone Racing League announced on Wednesday that it had signed deals to broadcast a 10-episode season on ESPN and ESPN2, along with the European stations Sky Sports Mix and 7Sports. According to league officials, stationary pilots will use headsets and joysticks to steer the drones through obstacle-filled courses — at up to 80 miles per hour. Tiny cameras mounted on the drones offer the human controllers a cockpit-like view. What do you think?

Posted in: Question of the Week

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Flexible Electronic Skin Patch Monitors Alcohol Levels

The alcohol sensor consists of a temporary tattoo (left) and a flexible printed electronic circuit board. Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a flexible wearable sensor that can accurately measure a person’s blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the data wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or other mobile device. The device can be worn on the skin and could be used by doctors and police officers for continuous, non-invasive and real-time monitoring of blood alcohol content.

Posted in: News

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New NASA Instrument Measures Greenhouse Gases

Mark Stephen (left) and Tony Yu are part of the team that developed the advanced laser system used on the CO2 Sounder Lidar. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Bill Hrybyk) NASA scientists and engineers have built an instrument powerful and accurate enough to gather around-the-clock global atmospheric carbon-dioxide (CO2) measurements from space. The CO2 Sounder Lidar operates by bouncing an infrared laser light off the Earth’s surface. Like all atmospheric gases, carbon dioxide absorbs light in narrow wavelength bands — in this case, the infrared. By tuning the laser to the infrared, scientists can detect and then analyze the level of carbon dioxide in that vertical path.

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Sensors Measure Power Use by Each Device in a Household

Researchers at MIT have developed a device and software that could figure out exactly how much power is being used by every appliance, lighting fixture, and device in a home. (Bryce Vickmark) New postage-stamp-sized sensors developed at MIT measure exactly how much power is being used by every device in a household. No wires need to be disconnected, and the placement of the sensors over the incoming power line does not require any particular precision. The sensors pick up so much information about spikes and patterns in the voltage and current, that the system can tell the difference between every different kind of light, motor, and other device, and show exactly which ones go on and off at what times.

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New at IMTS

Optomec (Albuquerque, NM) unveiled its LENS machine tool machines that integrate the company's metal 3D printing technology into standard CNC machine tool platforms. Three standard system configurations are offered, making hybrid and traditional metal additive manufacturing more affordable and accessible. The three systems are open-atmosphere, hybrid additive and subtractive, and an inert system with a hermetically sealed chamber.

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