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Will robo-cabs lower gas emissions?

This week's Question: In last week's Nature Climate Change journal, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers reported that, by 2030, traveling by driverless electric taxi could lower greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 90% compared with the same length ride in a privately owned gas-powered car today. Almost half of the savings is attributable to “right-sizing,” where the size of the taxi deployed is tailored to each trip’s occupancy needs. According to a report by the Rand Corp., all manufacturers working on cars that can drive themselves plan to release vehicles with semi-autonomous features by 2017. What do you think? Will robo-cabs lower gas emissions?

Posted in: Question of the Week

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Tech Trend Report: Will GaN Knock out Silicon Semiconductors?

This whitepaper is the first in a series from Intercomp, a premier electronics component parts distributor with value analysis/value engineering services designed to help companies with product innovations, development, sourcing and quality management.

Posted in: White Papers, Electronics

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Nanogenerator Harvests Power from Rolling Tires

A group of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers and a collaborator from China have developed a nanogenerator that harvests energy from a car's rolling tire friction. The technology ultimately could provide automobile manufacturers with a new way to reuse energy and provide greater vehicle efficiency.

Posted in: News

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Diamond-Like Coating Application Improves Engine Components

Applying carbon coatings to engine components, such as piston rings and pins, reduces friction and lowers fuel consumption. Using a new laser-based method, researchers at Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, Munich, Germany, say they can now produce layers of carbon that are almost as hard as diamond. The team of researchers have created hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous carbon coatings of up to 20 micrometers, which, they say, are more resistant to wear than conventional diamond-like coatings.

Posted in: News

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Researchers Prevent Fires in Next-Gen Lithium Batteries

New research from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA, could help remove a major barrier to developing lithium-sulfur and lithium-air batteries. The SLAC engineering team discovered that adding two chemicals to a lithium metal battery's electrolyte prevents the formation of dendrites, “fingers” of lithium that pierce the barrier between the battery’s halves and cause electrical shorts, overheating, and fires. The engineers discovered that adding both chemicals, in specific amounts, stopped lithium dendrite formation and the lithium metal electrode acquired a stable protective coating that improved the battery’s performance.

Posted in: News

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Smart-Mortar Could Help Soldiers Hit Targets

The Army hopes its new 120mm Guided Enhanced Fragmentation Mortar (GEFM) will improve soldiers' ability to put artillery on target. The GEFM is a high- accuracy, GPS-guided mortar concept currently under development.

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The Truth about Parylene Coating & Medical Devices

Parylene is the generic name for members of a unique polymer series. Parylene conformal coatings represent a distinct family of organic polymeric coating materials that are polycrystalline and linear in nature, with innumerable commercial applications. Resilient, dielectric, and pinhole-free, parylenes are frequently selected for use with products subjected to ongoing conditions of duress that might otherwise diminish their performance.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Coatings & Adhesives

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