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Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama

Utilization of CO2 to produce life support consumables, such as water and oxygen, offers a potential advance for NASA’s cabin atmosphere revitalization system and in-situ resources utilization concepts for long-term manned space missions. Toward this goal, the innovators at Precision Combustion, Inc. have investigated the use of catalysts supported on patented short-contact-time Microlith® substrates for CO2 reduction via Bosch process. These catalytic substrates enabled faster reaction rates, higher CO2 conversion, and a reduced recycle penalty. Further improvements in size, volume, and weight are projected by splitting the chemistry of the Bosch process into two separate reactors: a reverse water-gas-shift (RWGS) reactor, and a carbon formation reactor (CFR). Carbon formation would be accomplished via the hydrogenation and/or Boudouard reactions. In this two-stage configuration, the operating conditions can be individually optimized to maximize CO2 conversion as well as the water and carbon production rates. The feasibility study, which included performance testing at various operating conditions, and durability testing were successfully demonstrated.

This work was done by Saurabh Vilekar, Christian Junaedi, and Kyle Hawley of Precision Combustion, Inc. for Marshall Space Flight Center. For more information, contact Ronald Darty, Licensing Executive in the MSFC Technology Transfer Office, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Refer to MFS-32960-1

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