Q&A

Q&A: Green Design & Manufacturing
A chemical process produces valuable biodegradable chemicals from discarded plastics.
Q&A: RF & Microwave Electronics

Fiorenzo Omenetto, Frank C. Doble Professor of Engineering at Tufts University School of Engineering, Dean of Research, and Director of the Tufts Silklab led a team that has...

Q&A: Electronics & Computers
Kristin Sampayan from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory found a fast way to switch high voltages.
Q&A: Automotive
Dr. Burak Ozpineci is developing a system that charges electric vehicles while driving.
Q&A: Unmanned Systems
New autonomous robotic devices can survey hazardous or difficult-to-reach sites faster than humans.
Q&A: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Rutgers researcher Xiaoran Fan developed a "HeadFi" method that uses ordinary headphones as sensors.
Q&A: Energy
Professor Qiaoqiang Gan of the University at Buffalo (NY) and his team developed a unique two-in-one system that uses solar energy for simultaneously cooling and heating — without electricity.
Q&A: Electronics & Computers
Professor Shirley Meng explains why there's a demand for stretchable batteries.
Q&A: Energy
USC researchers found a way to use idle oil and gas wells for energy storage.
Q&A: Materials

Brian Salazar and his UC Berkeley team have developed a new way to reinforce concrete with a polymer lattice, an advance that could rival other polymer-based enhancements and improve...

Q&A: Materials
See how Dr. Andrei Kolmakov and his team are using low-energy electron beams to 3D-print tiny gel structures in liquids.
Q&A: Electronics & Computers
A new class of medical instruments uses flexible electronics to improve patient outcomes in minimally invasive surgeries.
Q&A: Nanotechnology
A nanoLED has up to 1,000 times the brightness of conventional submicron-sized LEDs.
Q&A: Electronics & Computers
Prof. Jacob Robinson developed an implantable neural stimulator the size of a grain of rice.
Q&A: Transportation
A new system from Oak Ridge National Laboratory enables electric vehicles to be charged while on the road.
Q&A: Materials
An adhesive can be deactivated by applying a small voltage.
Q&A: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
A robotic finger has a sense of touch that can be localized with high precision over a large, multi-curved surface.
Q&A: Green Design & Manufacturing
A new process will reduce the cost of manufacturing graphene by a factor of more than 100.
Q&A: Energy
Lenan Zhang and his team at MIT developed a small, economical, highly efficient device to provide fresh drinking water using only the Sun for its energy input.
Q&A: Materials
David Kaplan is solidifying silk to make products like rods and plates for medical implants.
Q&A: Wearables
Drexel Professor Genevieve Dion is coating yarn with the highly conductive, two-dimensional material MXene.
Q&A: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Q&A: Energy
Changing directions of twist and coiling changes whether a material cools or heats.
Q&A: Electronics & Computers
Sherry Towfighian and her team made a big improvement on how microphones are manufactured.
Q&A: Wearables
Professor Negar Tavassolian is using vibration sensors to monitor heartbeats.
Q&A: Electronics & Computers

Robert F. Shepherd is Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. He is leading a team exploring the use of hydraulic fluids in soft robots to also...

Q&A: Robotics, Automation & Control

Soon-Jo Chung is Bren Professor of Aerospace in the Division of Engineering and Applied Science (EAS) at Caltech and research scientist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He and his team...

Q&A: Electronics & Computers

Aydin Aysu, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the Electrical & Computer Engineering Department at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, where he helped develop a technique for...

Q&A: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Ian Y. Wong, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Engineering, Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology and Biotechnology at Brown University in Providence, RI. He and colleagues have...

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