Q&A

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Q&A: Propulsion
Prasad Kandula and a group of scientists and engineers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing a modular medium-voltage system to fill the existing gap between high-voltage transmission and low-voltage power electronics.
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Q&A: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering Ron Miles and his team at Binghamton University, New York, have developed an entirely new microphone technology based on research into how spiders hear.
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Q&A: Materials
Michael Kirka and a team of researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are the first to 3D print large rotating steam turbine blades. They achieved it with robot-controlled wire arc additive manufacturing.
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Q&A: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Javier Ramos, CTO, and his team from Inkbit Corporation, Medford, MA, along with researchers from MIT and ETH Zurich, have developed a 3D inkjet printer that uses contact-free computer vision feedback to print hybrid objects with a broad range of new functional chemistries.
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Q&A: Energy
Doctor Sergiy Kalnaus and his team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a framework for designing solid-state batteries that focuses on their underlying mechanics.
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Q&A: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Professor Pablo Zavattieri and his team from Purdue University have developed an architected material that can dissipate energy caused by bending, compression, torque, and tensile stresses, avoiding permanent plastic deformation or damage.
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Q&A: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Professor Stephen Lynch, of Penn State’s College of Engineering, along with colleagues at Michigan State University and the University of Wyoming, have developed a process for 3D printing a high-temperature ceramic gas turbine part.
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Q&A: Design
Professor Michael Dickey, of North Carolina State University, and his team have developed a unique process that allows you to print 3D metal objects that have good electric and thermal conductivity as well as good structural properties.
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Q&A: Sensors/Data Acquisition
A solar-powered wireless sensor system developed by a Drexel University team can continuously monitor bridge deformation and could be used to alert authorities if the bridge performance deteriorates significantly.
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Q&A: Power
Radha Krishna Moorthy is lead researcher on an Oak Ridge National Laboratory project to create a new architecture to modernize the electric grid from the bottom up. The approach combines hardware and software to monitor equipment health, speed up communication and increase security.
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Q&A: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Professor Patrick Mercier and his team at the University of California, San Diego, have developed an RFID smart tag that uses the signals generated by a smartphone to both read and power it.
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Q&A: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Zhiqun (Daniel) Deng and a team of researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to develop a nanogenerator that harnesses the renewable energy of open ocean waves to power observation platforms, and more, in the middle of the ocean.
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Q&A: Photonics/Optics
Mateus Corato Zanarella is the lead author of a Nature Photonics article describing the creation of tunable visible lasers of very pure colors from near-ultraviolet to near-infrared that fit on a fingertip.
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Q&A: Test & Measurement
Researchers have developed a theory that predicts the limits to which metals can be subjected to cyclic stress before failing.
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Q&A: Materials
Jason Patrick, assistant professor of civil, construction, and environmental engineering at North Carolina State University, and his team have developed a new composite material for applications like airplane wings and wind turbine blades in which hidden defects and damage can self-heal.
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Q&A: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Professor Jun Yao and his team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, have created a tiny sensor that can simultaneously measure electrical and mechanical cellular responses in cardiac tissue.
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Q&A: Energy
Ben Ollis and a team of engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory are creating a novel orchestrator tool to manage a cluster of microgrids so they can directly support and communicate with each other, making them more resilient during long power outages. It is being installed as a demonstration project in the small town of Adjuntas in the Central Mountains of Puerto Rico.
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Q&A: Energy
Dr. Brandon Ennis, Sandia National Laboratories’ offshore wind technical lead, had a radically new idea for offshore wind turbines: instead of a tall unwieldy tower, with blades at the top, he imagined a towerless turbine with blades pulled taut like a bow.
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Q&A: Design
MIT researchers have developed a new kind of battery, made entirely from abundant, inexpensive materials.
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Q&A: Materials
A new kind of optical concentrator can passively focus the sun onto a photovoltaic cell from any angle to reduce the amount of photovoltaic material needed for a given amount of power generation.
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Q&A: Robotics, Automation & Control

A team of engineers from the University of Glasgow led by Professor Ravinder Dahiya developed an artificial skin with a new type of processing system based on...

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Q&A: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Professor Robert MacCurdy and his team at the University of Colorado at Boulder have developed and characterized a method to print 3D structures with the simultaneous use of...

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Q&A: Semiconductors & ICs

Professor Kenneth K. O. and his colleagues at The University of Texas at Dallas and Oklahoma State University have developed an innovative and affordable terahertz imager microchip that can enable...

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Q&A: Energy
An inexpensive, clear coating has reduced snow and ice accumulation on solar panels, enabling them to generate up to 85% more energy in early testing.
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Q&A: Test & Measurement
Dr. Israel Owens and his team at Sandia National Laboratories have used a crystal smaller than a dime and a laser smaller than a shoebox to safely measure 20 million volts without making physical contact to the electrode.
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Q&A: Semiconductors & ICs
Professor Jiwoong Park and his team have made a material that is crystalline in the X-Y direction, but amorphous in the Z direction.
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Q&A: Nanotechnology
An "E-Skin" material can be printed without polymer binders.
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Q&A: Test & Measurement
New lithium-ion batteries that can be charged in 10 to 15 minutes at a roadside charging station.
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Q&A: Transportation

Jingcheng Ma, along with a team of researchers at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, found a way to make ultra-thin water-resistant surface coatings robust enough to...

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