A comprehensive library of technical briefs from engineering experts at NASA and major government, university, and commercial laboratories covering all aspects of innovations in electronics, software, photonics, imaging, motion control, automation, sensors, test, materials, manufacturing, mechanical, and mechatronics.

Latest Tech Briefs

A novel technique for a high-brightness coherent and few-cycle duration source spans seven optical octaves.
Imagine being able to snap a picture of extremely fast events on the order of a picosecond.
Briefs: Photonics/Optics
Optimal Information About the Invisible
Researcher are finding ways to estimate a target location when light gets deflected by a disordered structure.
The sensor monitors the oil circulation ratio in real time for heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration systems.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Quantum-Limit-Approaching Chemical Sensing Chip
Study shows improvements to chemical sensing chip that aims to quickly and accurately identify drugs and other trace chemicals.
A patch of needles connected to a paper sensor diagnoses conditions such as prediabetes.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
New Flexible and Highly Reliable Sensor
Real-time health monitoring and sensing abilities of robots require soft electronics, but a challenge of using such materials lies in their reliability.
A mathematical framework can help engineers make informed decisions about which sensors to use and where they must be positioned in aircraft and other machines.
Sensors need to be flexible, stretchable, biodegradable, safe, and stable for use in the body.
The material can be recycled, making renewable energy more sustainable while lowering costs in the process.
Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Prototype Fuel Gauge for Orbit
The technology could continuously monitor fluid flow in pipes on the International Space Station and prevent satellites from colliding.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Obstacle-Avoiding Drone Uses Live Moth Antenna
“Smellicopter” uses a live moth antenna to avoid obstacles and seek out smells.
The functioning human heart pump provides a model to track and trace what happens at the cell and molecular levels in the pump structure.
The invention can become color-changing “artificial muscle.”
The coatings can be deposited on substrates such as glass, polymers, metals, and aerogels.
The technology could lead to a platform for quantum computation or new types of energy-efficient data storage applications.
This method is an important step towards smaller, more advanced, environmentally friendly electronics.
A potential boon to green manufacturing, the new glue saves on energy, time, and space.
The material is designed for high-temperature applications in aircraft, building insulation, personal protective clothing, industrial, and automotive.
Equipment designers can simplify design efforts and adjust controller platforms as needed when they standardize on electronic input/output products.
Briefs: Nanotechnology
High-Color-Purity 3D Printing
This method obtains high-color-purity 3D objects using a new class of nanoparticles.
Briefs: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Advanced Supercritical Water Oxidation Reactor
This technology has potential across many industries including water reclamation and treatment, and waste destruction in liquid waste streams.
By converting CO2 into complex hydrocarbon products, a new catalyst could aid in large-scale efforts to recycle excess carbon dioxide.
The next generation of waterproof smart fabrics can be laser-printed and made in minutes.
This built-in security measure would prevent hackers from getting enough information about the circuit to reverse-engineer it.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Charging Port for Autonomous Drone Swarms
Hundreds of drones can recharge autonomously on unmanned ground vehicles.
Briefs: Green Design & Manufacturing
Process Turns Plastic Bags into Adhesives
A chemical process converts polyethylene plastic into a strong, valuable adhesive.
The stretchable electronics are more stable as they change shape, which could lead to next-generation sensors for healthcare applications.
The algorithms enable drones to quickly switch between hover and forward flight.

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