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R2's Excellent Adventure

When the Space Shuttle Discovery launches tomorrow, it will carry six human -- and one non-human -- crewmembers to the International Space Station. The non-human is Robonaut 2 (R2), which is set to become the first humanoid robot in space. R2 will be unpacked several months after it arrives, and tested on the station. He...

Question of the Week
Should Congress pass the Right to Repair Act?

This week's Question of the Week, a suggestion from INSIDER reader Glenn Barkley, concerns the Right to Repair Act, a bill that would require auto manufacturers to sell to non-dealer repair shops the complete repair information and diagnostic tools, currently only provided to dealer service centers....

University of Michigan scientists have created pixels that will enable LED-projected and -wearable displays to be more energy efficient with more light manipulation...

While pursuing a master’s degree in aerospace guidance, navigation, and control theory at UT Austin, Terry Hill got an opportunity...

An equation developed in part by researchers at the University of Michigan could do for organic semiconductors what the Shockley ideal diode equation did for inorganic...

Blog
Analysts Add to Creo Conversation

Yesterday, after unveiling Creo, PTC's soon-to-arrive design application suite, the company arranged for a panel of analysts to address attendee questions about the product. The roundtable included Marc Halpern, Research VP at Gartner, Sanjeev Pal, Research Manager at IDC, and John MacKrell, a senior consultant...

Purdue researchers will collaborate with Rutgers University, the University of Arizona, Michigan State University, and Orbital Technologies Corp. (Madison, WI) on a four-year...

Blog
Lightning Strikes With PTC's Creo

There was a bit of a crowd lining up near Boston's Park Plaza this morning, and if it wasn't for all the business-casual attire, you may have thought another Apple Store was opening up down the street. The event was actually PTC's unveiling of its new product suite: Creo.

Here's the quick...

Question of the Week
Will you drive this type of robotic car in your lifetime?

This week's Question of the Week addresses another technical development from Google. In early October, the search giant announced that it has been testing robotic cars on U.S. city streets. The vehicles, equipped with a complex array of sensors and cameras that allowed them to steer...

Question of the Week
Should there be a large-scale freeze on foreclosures?

This week's Question of the Week addresses home foreclosures. Several major home lenders, including JP Morgan Chase and Bank of America, have suspended foreclosures in parts or all of the country because of sloppy paperwork and improper oversight of the many loans that went bad. Some say,...

Scientists from Rice University and Lockheed Martin have discovered a way to use simple silicon to radically increase the capacity of lithium-ion batteries. The researchers are...

Question of the Week
Do you plan to buy the Google TV device?

This week's Question of the Week addresses Google TV. Engineers are putting the finishing touches on Google TV, a software platform that aims to bring the complete Internet experience to television sets. Expected in stores later this month, the Google TV device has a remote-control keyboard/pointing...

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) of Livermore, CA is home to the world's largest and highest-energy laser. On September 29th, the NIF completed its first integrated ignition...

Question of the Week
Do you have faith in the news media to provide fair, reliable information?

This week's Question of the Week concerns a recent Gallup poll that revealed that a majority of Americans (57%) say they have little or no trust in the mass media to report the news fully, accurately, and fairly. Sixty-three percent of respondents perceived bias.

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In 2001, NASA engineer Michael Ewert developed and patented a unique solar-powered vapor-compression refrigeration system that...

Graphite foam technology developed by James Klett of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Materials Science and Technology Division extends the life of light-emitting diode...

The Office of Naval Research Global (ONR Global) continues to pursue aggressive energy goals established by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, with the design of a system...

Question of the Week
Should Internet communication services be redesigned so that law enforcement can carry out legally authorized intercepts?

This week's Question of the Week focuses on the redesign of some Internet communication services. Law enforcement officials want Congress to require all services that enable communications — including encrypted e-mail...

Electronic products pollute the environment with a number of heavy metals before, during, and after they're used. In the U.S. alone, an estimated 70% of heavy metals...

Sensors developed by researchers at the University of Washington and the Georgia Institute of Technology use residential wiring to transmit information to and from...

News: Green Design & Manufacturing
eZines

November 2011

Lighting Technology
Advances in LEDs & Solid-State Lighting


August 2011

Lighting Technology
Advances in LEDs & Solid-State Lighting


September ...

As industries and consumers seek improved battery power sources, a new microscopy technique developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers is providing a novel...

Question of the Week
Should smartphones be used as learning tools in the classroom?

This week's Question of the Week focuses on smartphones in the classroom. Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty recently suggested students should be allowed to use smartphones in the classroom, saying that the devices have a variety of helpful educational tools -- calendars, planners, and...

News: Green Design & Manufacturing
Synthetic Fuel Research Underway

Purdue University researchers have developed a facility aimed at learning precisely how coal and biomass are broken down in reactors called gasifiers as part of a project to strengthen the scientific...

Question of the Week
Will 3D catch on in the long run, and will TV fans and movie buffs demand the technology?

This week’s Question of the Week concerns 3D. The technology offers moviegoers and TV fans an enhanced viewing experience, and many recent 3D films, including Avatar and Alice in Wonderland, have had box office success. Several 3D movies, however, have...

The sun’s rays can be highly destructive to many materials and lead to a gradual degradation of many systems developed to harness it. MIT researchers have developed a new...

Desmond Lun, an associate professor of computer science at Rutgers University–Camden, is researching how to alter the genetic makeup of E. coli to produce biodiesel fuel...

Releasing engineered nano-sized disks or sulphuric acid, a condensable vapour, above the Earth are two novel approaches that offer advantages over simply putting sulphur...

Question of the Week
Should airplanes have families-only sections?

This week's Question of the Week concerns a poll from Skyscanner, a travel fare-comparison Web site. To reduce noise and keep children in one place, sixty percent of more than 2,000 surveyed travelers said it would be a good idea for airplanes to have families-only sections on flights.

What...

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