Photonics/​Optics

Access our comprehensive library of technical briefs on photonics and optics, from engineering experts at NASA and major government, university, and commercial laboratories.

Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Laser Technology Assesses Cancer Cells
Laser light induces ultrasonic vibrations in a sample that can be used to image cells, blood vessels, and tissues.
The newest version of these combs could revolutionize clocks, telescopes, and telecommunications.
Flat-panel technology could transform antennas, wireless, and cellphone communications.
This system encodes information in twisting beams of light.
Self-powering, color-changing humidity sensors are applicable to various fields including smart windows, health care, and safety management.
Empa researchers were able to demonstrate real-time acoustic monitoring of laser weld seams.
A new type of motion capture technology accurately tracks an athlete during the push start phase of performance.
Researchers tackled the problem using a geophysical measurement called seismic anisotropy.
One unexpected application for spider silk is its use in the creation of biocompatible lenses.
University of Colorado researchers have described a new silicon chip that improves the resolution and scanning speed needed for a lidar system.
Real-time terahertz imaging with a single-pixel detector.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
Breathable Electronics for Wearable Technologies
The material was designed specifically for biomedical or wearable technologies, since sweat and volatile organic compounds evaporate away from the skin.
Features include unusual color changes and high touch sensitivity.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Wearable Strain Sensor Using Light Transmittance
This technology shows potential for the detection of subtle human motions and the real-time monitoring of body postures for healthcare applications.
An ultrafast image sensor with a built-in neural network can be trained to recognize certain objects.
The method determines whether circuits are accurately executing complex operations that classical computers can’t tackle.
Briefs: Imaging
Ultrafast Camera Captures Transparent Objects and Phenomena
The camera can take up to 1 trillion pictures per second of transparent objects, shockwaves, and other phenomena.
This technology is useful for energy, industrial, and aerospace applications.
Briefs: Test & Measurement
Tracking Lab-Grown Tissue with Light
A new proof-of-concept photonic pH sensor could advance studies of tissue regeneration.
Tiny, metal-rich particles can be excited with a low-power laser for deep-tissue imaging.
The technique could easily be translated into existing medical device manufacturing processes for use in orthopedic implants.
This technique offers enhanced resolution and improved system reliability for mapping and obstacle recognition and navigation for vehicles.
Smart adaptive clothing can lower the body temperature of the wearer in hot climates.
Biologically inspired ultrathin arrayed camera captures super-resolution images.
A research team has built a super-high-speed microscope.
A new low-cost imaging system could make it easier to track mosquito species that carry disease, enabling a more timely and targeted response.
Using integrated photonic chips fabricated at EPFL, scientists have demonstrated laser-based microwave generators.
A new CT scan method using intense synchrotron radiation produces higher quality images within milliseconds.
Researchers at Linköping University, together with colleagues in China, have developed a tiny unit that is both an optical transmitter and a receiver.

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