Robotics, Automation & Control

Access our comprehensive library of technical briefs on robotics, automation & control, from engineering experts at NASA and government, university, and commercial laboratories.

This technology can work with multiple wavelengths of light simultaneously.
The learning approach allows swarms of unmanned vehicles to optimally accomplish their mission while minimizing performance uncertainty.
Tiny aircraft that weigh as much as a fruit fly could serve as Martian atmospheric probes.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
Wavy Surfaces for Better Light Control
This method could impact optical technologies such as smartphone cameras, biosensors, or autonomous vision for robots and self-driving cars.
This capability will optimize performance of the vehicle through different phases of flight.
A soft hydrogel, driven by an oscillatory chemical reaction, produces an autonomous integrated pump for microfluidic applications.
This mini robot improves precision and control of teleoperated surgical procedures.
Fully integrated flexible electronics made of magnetic sensors and organic circuits open the path towards the development of electronic skin.
Briefs: Unmanned Systems
Testing Swarming Drones
This system has a capacity of more than 1,500 times the volume of a typical testing facility.
The robots could fly silently for covert operations and stay steady through turbulence.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
Nanomaterial Gives Robots Chameleon Skin
Features include unusual color changes and high touch sensitivity.
This technology provides rapid results, improving hospital workflow and patient care.
The ultra-light robotic insect can be folded or crushed, yet continues to move.
This technique can be used by people who are paralyzed or have neurodegenerative diseases.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
Technique Mass-Produces Cell-Sized Robots
This process could lead to tiny, self-powered devices for environmental, industrial, or medical monitoring.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Engineers 3D-Print Sensors Onto Moving Organs
Designed to assist in robotic surgeries, biomedical devices can be printed in and on the human body.
The “E-dermis” will enable amputees to perceive through prosthetic fingertips.
This material could be used for artificial muscles that power bio-inspired robots.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Gripper Handles Freely Moving Cables
The gripper’s soft, sensitive fingers could enable robots to help with tying knots, wire shaping, or surgical suturing.
Briefs: Motion Control
Wireless Aquatic Robot Cleans Water
Inspired by a coral polyp, this plastic mini robot moves by magnetism and light.
Complex locomotion techniques enable the rover to climb hills covered with soft granular material.
This technology can help robots walk up to 40 percent faster on uneven terrain such as pebbles and wood chips.
An ultrafast image sensor with a built-in neural network can be trained to recognize certain objects.
This approach could be used to cost-effectively make soft robots and wearable technologies.
Briefs: Motion Control
4D Printing of Morphing Structures
A new method manufactures complex shapeshifters for soft robots and biomedical implants.
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Wearable Strain Sensor Using Light Transmittance
This technology shows potential for the detection of subtle human motions and the real-time monitoring of body postures for healthcare applications.
The sensor has applications in fields such as robotics, healthcare, and security.
This technique offers enhanced resolution and improved system reliability for mapping and obstacle recognition and navigation for vehicles.
Multiple commercial applications include defense, search and rescue, and disaster relief.
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