Billy's Blog

On Billy's Blog, Billy Hurley, Digital Editorial Manager, writes stories about new and innovative achievements in design engineering, from industrial robots and autonomous vehicles to 3D printers and see-through solar cells. Along with other Tech Briefs writers and editors, Billy shares his opinions, poses questions to readers, and finds the fun, interesting, and unexpected stories behind today's leading-edge inventions.

Blog
Secure Payments

Credit card transactions may be a little more secure due to the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) Version 2, which was recently adopted by the payment card industry. The system is co-authored by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Carnegie Mellon University, in collaboration with...

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Tech Needs of the Week

A company seeks microwavable packaging that produces authentic grilled foods in a home microwave oven with typical microwave food preparation times and convenience (3-8 minutes). All materials must be generally recognized as safe for contact with human food and withstand temperatures from -40 degrees to 450 degrees F....

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NASA Briefs

NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center has developed a prototype of an advanced resistive exercise device (ARED) that can perform a number of different exercises on one machine. Conceived to help astronauts maintain strength and endurance in low-gravity environments, the ARED could also be advantageous in terrestrial settings.

...

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Tourette's Treatment

Researchers from the Neurological Institute at University Hospitals Case Medical Center (UHCMC) have found that Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) helps patients with Tourette Syndrome (TS) – the neurobehavioral disorder characterized by sudden, repetitive muscle movements and vocalizations. DBS involves the surgical...

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Optical Tweezers

MIT researchers have found a way to use the technology of optical tweezers to pick up, hold, and move around individual cells and other objects on the surface of a microchip. The development could become an important tool for both biological research and materials research, say MIT researchers Matthew J. Lang and David C....

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Brain Machine Interface

Neuroscientists have advanced brain- machine interface (BMI) technology to the point where severely handicapped people who cannot contract even one leg or arm muscle can now independently compose and send e-mails and operate a TV in their homes. They are using only their thoughts to execute these...

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Child Assisting Robot

The use of robots to help infants with special needs learn cognitive movements is the focus of research at the University of Delaware. Two university researchers - James Galloway, associate professor of physical therapy, and Sunil Agrawal, professor of mechanical engineering - have outfitted kid-size robots to provide...

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Spotting Alzheimer's

Duke University Medical Center researchers have pinpointed a new marker that may help identify those at greatest risk for cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. The Duke researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to track regions of the brain that become...

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Tech Needs of the Week

A company is seeking new analgesic actives. Speed of effectiveness, toleration, and shelf-life are of particular interest. Analgesics vary in dosage load, dosage form, molecular size, speed of effectiveness, and side effects or toxicity. The form of the new proposed analgesic active is open to discussion. A minimum of...

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Brain Wave Sensor

A tiny sensor that can detect magnetic field changes as small as 70 Femtoteslas — equivalent to the brain waves of a person daydreaming — has been demonstrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The sensor could operate on a single AA battery and reduce the costs of non-invasive...

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The Technicolor Brain

By activating multiple fluorescent proteins in neurons, neuroscientists at Harvard University have developed a method to image the brain and nervous system in a plethora of colors dubbed a "Brainbow."

The technique, developed by Harvard scientists Jean Livet, Joshua R. Sanes, and Jeff W. Lichtman, allows researchers...

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Rugged Wireless Sensors

Researchers at Purdue University, working with the U.S Air Force, have developed tiny wireless sensors resilient enough to survive the harsh conditions inside jet engines to detect when critical bearings are close to failing and prevent breakdowns.

The devices use MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) technology to...

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Current Attractions

The Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate at NASA's Glenn Research Center has developed a new silicon carbide differential amplifier integrated circuit chip that may provide benefits to anything requiring long-lasting electronic circuits in very hot environments. The chip exceeded 1,700 hours of continuous operation at 500...

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Carbon Producing Wildfires

The recent rash of wildfires in Southern California will likely increase concern over long-term global warming. Research published in the Nov. 1 issue of the journal Nature concluded that wildfires in the boreal regions across northern Canada in 2003 were a major factor in higher carbon dioxide levels in that vast...

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Techs of the Week

A process has been developed to manufacture a self-aligned transistor where a thermally intolerant material may be used as a material of a gate insulating film and the gate electrode. The process makes it possible to produce high-performance, highly reliable, and inexpensive transistor devices. It leads to the improvement of...

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Hot Stuff

Bite into a hot pepper, and you'll feel the burn. But then, your tongue will go numb. It is that numbing process that scientists are studying in an effort to reduce post-surgery pain. Scientists have found that the chemical that makes chile peppers so hot (capsaicin) can actually relieve the pain of surgery. Capsaicin is being dripped...

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Helping the Blind "See"

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has licensed two technologies that could bring affordable graphic reading systems to the blind and visually impaired. The two systems bring electronic images to life in the same way that Braille makes words readable.

The first technology, a tactile graphic...

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Technology Business Needs

Low NOX Burner Technology and Advanced Combustion Technology

A company is interested in technology partnership or license agreement of deNOX technologies such as SCR or SNCR and advanced burner technologies.

Nanotechnologies Wanted

S.O.F.C. (solid oxide fuel cell) technology; low-temperature SOFC...

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Crystal Mystery Solved

When discovered in 1938, the crystal ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) was observed to exhibit unusual electrical properties. A Florida State University chemist, Naresh S. Dalal, and three colleagues of the Universidad Nacional de Rosario in Argentina used the supercomputer at FSU's Supercomputer Computations Research...

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Tech Needs of the Week

A wide range of new processing and preparation technologies for use in pharmaceutical preparation is sought. Such technologies may enhance current chemistry processes such as finer milling that leads to faster in-process reactions. Or, the technologies may be applicable to pharmaceuticals after preparation, such as...

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National Nano Engineering Conference

NASA Tech Briefs' 2007 National Nano Engineering Conference (NNEC) is being held November 14-15 at the Marriott Boston Copley Place. The NNEC is the premier event focused on current and future nano- technology developments. The event also includes the presentation of the third annual Nano 50™ Awards with a...

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Virus Simulation Software

Researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech, have created a computer program called Pathogen Simulation (PathSim) to study the progression of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in humans.

David Thorley-Lawson, PhD, professor of pathology...

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Techs of the Week

An input assisting device for CAD operation is designed to circumvent time-consuming and conventional methods of using a mouse. The technology comprises sensors and a physical/structural framework which is most effective when constructing a three dimensional object in a free-space field. This device enhances the synergy between...

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Technology for Visually Impaired

By adding features to commonly used chemical- engineering software packages, researchers at the University of Arkansas, the University of Akron, and Chemstations Inc. have developed adaptive technology that allows blind or visually impaired students and working professionals to perform the essential functions of...

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Hydrogen Sensor

It took millions of dollars and more than a decade of research and development, but a unique hydrogen sensor invented and patented in 1994 by scientists at Sandia National Laboratories is about to finally find its way into the commercial sector. What makes the Wide-Range Hydrogen Sensor unique is the fact that it was the first to...

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NextTechs Technology Business Briefs

Breakthrough Imaging of Blood Vessels and Other Anatomical Structures

This breakthrough technology allows for the imaging of vessels, blood vessels or any other type of vessels in biological bodies, using high penetration radiation.

Fluorescent Nanodiamonds

Glowing nanodiamonds can be...

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Good Vibrations

Researchers at Clarkson University in Potsdam, NY have developed technology that converts the vibrations generated by passing traffic into electricity. This electricity can be used to charge small, battery- powered wireless sensors that monitor the structural integrity of bridges.

According to Assistant Professor Edward S....

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Golden Healing

Physicians first used injections of gold salts in the early 1900s to ease arthritis, but treatment took months to take effect and side effects included rashes, mouth sores, and kidney damage. Now treatments like methotrexate and biologically engineered drugs are preferred over gold. Scientists at Duke University Medical Center...

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Coming Attractions

This monthly review lets you "meet" the new advertisers appearing in NTB and its supplements. Here's a sneak peek at the products, services, and offers available from November's first-time advertisers.

AMPS Technologies (Pittsburgh, PA) develops Advanced Multi-Physics Simulation (AMPS) software, an advanced simulation...

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