Billy's Blog

On Billy's Blog, Billy Hurley, Digital Editorial Manager, writes stories about new and innovative achievements in design engineering, from industrial robots and autonomous vehicles to 3D printers and see-through solar cells. Along with other Tech Briefs writers and editors, Billy shares his opinions, poses questions to readers, and finds the fun, interesting, and unexpected stories behind today's leading-edge inventions.

See what the SuperCam will do when it arrives on Mars in 2021.
Blog : Manufacturing & Prototyping
New Discoveries, From Just a Grain of Moon Dust
“We’re analyzing rocks from space, atom by atom,” says researcher Jennika Greer.
Editor Bruce A. Bennett shares his observations from SPIE Photonics West, including the emergence of LiDAR.
Blog : Sensors/Data Acquisition
SPIE Photonics West 2020 – Sights from Day 1
See what caught Bruce A. Bennett's eye during Day 1 of Photonics West 2020 in San Francisco.
Researchers from the University of Illinois are looking at all the different ways to create a non-pneumatic automotive tire.
Cornell researcher T.J. Wallin explains what's so cool about a robot that sweats.
When astronauts arrive on the Moon, their habitat may be one made out of fungi.
"View it as an infrared privacy shield," says Professor Mikhail Kats.
To improve the aqueous lithium-ion battery, RPI researchers tried out niobium tungsten oxide.
NASA is using the International Space Station as a testbed for 3D printing.
NASA came to CES with a message: We're going back to the Moon, and we'll need help from industry to do it.
Stuck in traffic? The Pegasus flying car can get you out of there.
Here are five technologies that aim to add intelligence to the most surprising household objects.
A fun way to show the robustness of a soft robot? Swat it.
As additive manufacturing supports the creation of critical metal parts, designers need to know that the parts are high-quality.
If a satellite breaks in orbit, there's not much that can be done. A professor envisions a new idea for refueling and repair.
Blog : Robotics, Automation & Control
Countdown: The Top Stories of 2019

Tech Briefs in 2019 celebrated historic NASA anniversaries, new ways to power electronics, and innovative hacks of our “smartest” technologies.

Parylene coatings are being used in the medical industry and even space. Our expert explains why.
New ceramics expand on ways to more efficiently use heat radiation.
New measurements could help experts guess the location and size of the next earthquake.
Blog : Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Aluminum Joining Methods: Welding vs. Adhesives
Our expert examines the pros and cons of welding, adhesives, and other metal joining methods.
Computed tomography is being used in the medical and industrial field. An expert explains how the two imaging techniques differ.
A new charging cell wants to use low-grade heat from our industrial processes to power our devices.
What's the best aluminum for extrusion? A Tech Briefs reader asks our expert.
A team in Germany has a quicker, cleaner approach to welding metal to plastic: The HPCI® Joining Gun.
Livox uses machine learning to ease communication.
A minimal, map-less approach to drone navigation takes after the bee.
The 'Biode' saves power by eliminating the need for AC/DC conversion.
The ULiSSES device preserves organs, without the ice chest.
News : Electronics & Computers
AUSA 2019: A Really Cool Computer
Ben Sharfi, CEO of General Micro Systems (GMS), says he has the Product of the Year. Do you agree?
Question of the Week
Will Cooling Coatings Catch On?

Webcasts

Upcoming Webinars: Software

Using Simulation to Design Robust Adhesively Bonded Structures

Upcoming Webinars: Automotive

Electric-Vehicle Transmission Development and Simulation

Upcoming Webinars: Energy

Thermal Management Crisis: Knowing Your Passive Solution Options

Upcoming Webinars: Internet of Things

IoT’s Role in Today’s Transportation Systems

On-Demand Webinars: Manufacturing & Prototyping

Testing and Inspecting 3D-Printed Parts

On-Demand Webinars: Manufacturing & Prototyping

3D Printed Metals Are Not All the Same