RF & Microwave Electronics

RF & Microwave

Stay on top of the latest advancements, Technical Briefs, and news for Design Engineers working with RF and Microwave technologies. Access news and product developments with Antennas and RF systems.

Latest Briefs & News

Articles: Electronics & Computers
Long-life Batteries for the IIoT
Choosing the right battery will save trouble and expense in the long run.
Products: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
New Products: September 2020 Sensor Technology
Safety-critical MEMS, absolute pressure sensors, thermal imaging cameras, and more.
Articles: RF & Microwave Electronics
Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) in Hyperspectral Imagers
Learn how to obtain large signals from hyperspectral imagers.
Products: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Product of the Month: September 2020 Tech Briefs
InnoSenT introduced the IMD-3000 radar system as an alternative to pushbutton switches.
With the emergence of a new generation of ultra-efficient electronic chips, the Wiegand technology is showing significant promise, especially in the exciting area of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT).
Products: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
New on the Market: August 2020
Data storage boards, modular plugs, equipment enclosures, and more.
Briefs: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Graphene Smart Textiles for Heat-Adaptive Clothing
Smart adaptive clothing can lower the body temperature of the wearer in hot climates.
Using integrated photonic chips fabricated at EPFL, scientists have demonstrated laser-based microwave generators.
Photoelectric sensors, cable connectors, power monitors, and USB3 cameras.
Technology Leaders: Connectivity
RF Innovations Give Batteries New Life
Low-power radio design is enabling new connected IoT products for consumer, commercial, industrial, and medical markets.
Briefs: Test & Measurement
Radiation-Hardened Gain Digitizer
This instrument has applications in medical equipment, robotics, and satellites.
The material could enable applications such as antennas that change frequencies on the fly or gripper arms for delicate or heavy objects.
Articles: Materials
Products of Tomorrow: May 2020
A cryptographic ID tag, a high-reliability NASA switch, and a stretchable thermoelectric generator...
The nonlinear camera captures high-resolution images of the interior of solid objects using terahertz (THz) radiation.

Even though ultrasound has been studied by scientists for many years, its capabilities in practical applications are yet to be fully harnessed.

Briefs: Electronics & Computers
RFID-Based System Enables Internet of Things
The technology could help in elder care with sensors throughout a home.
Hardware and software tweak microwave patterns to discover the most efficient way to identify objects.
The lasers are small and efficient enough to fit on a microchip.
Briefs: RF & Microwave Electronics
Ultra-Low-Power WiFi Radio Enables IoT Devices
Housed in a chip, it lets IoT devices communicate with existing WiFi networks.
Special Reports: Electronics & Computers
RF & Microwave Electronics - April 2020

In this compendium of recent articles from the editors of Aerospace & Defense Technology and Tech Briefs, read about how advances in RF electronics are enabling new applications in space and ground...

In the middle ground between microwaves and visible light lies terahertz radiation, and the promise of “Tray vision.”
An interview with Mike Horton, CTO of ACEINNA, Inc. (Boston, MA).
To clear up some of the confusion about what the industry means when it says 5G, here’s a guide to what it’s all about.
The sensor makes it easier to detect and manage ice accumulation on aircraft wings.
Editor Bruce A. Bennett shares his observations from SPIE Photonics West, including the emergence of LiDAR.
Articles: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Products of Tomorrow: February 2020
Life-saving sensors, soft hearing implants, and a new water-decontamination method
Briefs: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Underwater Telecom Cables Used as Seismic Network
Fiber-optic cables could help scientists study offshore earthquakes and the geologic structures hidden deep beneath the ocean surface.
This atom-based receiver has the potential to be smaller and work better in noisy environments than conventional radio receivers.
In some cases, radio frequency signals may be more useful for caregivers than cameras or other methods to collect health and behavioral data.

Videos