Materials & Coatings

Coatings & Adhesives

Browse the latest news and technical briefs that explore coatings and adhesives. Access the coatings and adhesive applications used in military, aerospace, medical devices, and automotive.

Latest Briefs & News

Bacterial pathogens can live on surfaces for days. What if frequently touched surfaces, such as doorknobs, could instantly kill them off?
Question of the Week: Materials
How Would You Use Gecko-Inspired Adhesion?

A team at Georgia Tech has discovered a Velcro-like way of mass-producing gecko-inspired adhesives. Principal investigator Prof. Michael Varenberg believes his team’s technology can someday be used on pick-and-place industrial machines, wall-scaling cleaners, and even small repair robots that travel...

A team at Georgia Tech has discovered a Velcro-like way of mass-producing gecko-inspired adhesives.
This method uses fiber optic probes for measurement of semiconductors, optical coatings, magnetic read/write heads, and precision machines.
With the recent boom in touch-based, polymer display substrates must be fingerprint-resistant.
White Papers: Materials
Developing Surface Treatment Processes for Bonding Dissimilar Materials

A recent concept in automotive lightweighting is the joining of dissimilar materials. The purpose is to tailor the materials in a structure to ensure that each part of...

Briefs: Electronics & Computers
Coating Extends Lithium Metal Battery Life
The coating could make lightweight lithium metal batteries safe and long-lasting for the next generation of electric vehicles.
Surface treatments have limitations that demand attention early in the design process.
The coating protects parking decks, bridges, concrete piers, offshore platforms, buildings, and cooling towers.
The adhesive that binds wet surfaces within seconds could be used to heal wounds or implant medical devices.
These thin films hold great promise for solar cells and LEDs.
Biodegradable batteries, solid-state ultracapacitors, and infrared camouflage.
An engineered surface treatment can reduce waste and improve efficiency in many processes.
The coating can prevent the transfer of antibiotic-resistant superbugs and other bacteria in settings ranging from hospitals to kitchens.
Question of the Week: Energy
Will Cooling Coatings Catch On?

This month’s Tech Briefs featured a potential alternative to the air conditioner: A painted-on polymer coating that can cool down a building.

Facility Focus: Sensors/Data Acquisition
Facility Focus: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Explore Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA's first space flight complex.
This coating acts as a spontaneous air cooler and can be fabricated, dyed, and applied like paint.
These materials may replace metals as lightweight, flexible heat dissipators in cars, computers, cellphones, and refrigerators.
Drexel Professor Genevieve Dion is coating yarn with the highly conductive, two-dimensional material MXene.
These soft robots can be rolled up and carried in a pocket.
Special Reports: Materials
Advanced Materials - February 2020

Breakthroughs in plastics, composites, metals, and other materials technologies are enabling exciting new applications in industries ranging from aerospace to automotive to medical. Read more in this...

"View it as an infrared privacy shield," says Professor Mikhail Kats.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
Robotic “Cockroach” Explores Underwater Environments
This microbot can walk on land, swim, and walk underwater.
Applying a surface-active agent makes metal easier to cut and shape into parts and pieces.
This electronic skin can track heart rate, respiration, muscle movement, and other health data.
This thin film can be used for ground-based and airborne applications in aircraft, balloons, and other flight missions.
The non-destructive coating has applications in structural health monitoring, aerospace, automotive, and military/defense.
Load-bearing structures in cars and airplanes could be manufactured from the metal foam.
Question of the Week: Materials
Can Gels Stop Wildfires?

A preventive treatment developed by Stanford researchers could greatly reduce the incidence and severity of wildfires. The cellulose-based, gel-like fluid protects against fires and stays on target vegetation through rain, wind, and other environmental exposure. Watch the demo on Tech Briefs TV.

Webcasts

Upcoming Webinars: Aerospace

Understanding O-ring Complexity in the Aerospace Industry

Upcoming Webinars: Robotics, Automation & Control

The Path to High-Level Autonomy for Commercial Vehicles

Upcoming Webinars: Medical

COVID-19: The New Design Paradigm and Emerging Technologies

Upcoming Webinars: Robotics, Automation & Control

Why Multiple Sensing Modalities Are Required to Achieve Level 3...

Upcoming Webinars: Aerospace

Aviation Electrification: Choosing Your Motor Topology and...

Upcoming Webinars: Robotics, Automation & Control

Collaborative Robotics: Sharing the Workspace

Videos