Briefs: Aerospace
The supports enable the production of higher-quality, less-expensive parts via additive manufacturing.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
New cell chemistry utilizes less costly and more abundant materials than lithium-ion batteries.
Briefs: Test & Measurement
A robot could immediately alert a human of small changes in their surrounding environment.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
The system enables robots to predict what their human coworker will do next.
Articles: Materials
Battery recycling, NASA's water treatment, and a wireless wearable transmitter.
Products: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Stratasys introduced three 3D printers for additive manufacturing of end-use parts.
Briefs: Robotics, Automation & Control
This system enhances processing via real-time, non-destructive defect tracking.
Blog: Electronics & Computers
Could a tool from the dentist's office lead to better recycling of lithium-ion batteries?
Blog: Electronics & Computers
A reader asks a Space Force expert about new markets, including data transport, traffic management, and advanced power.
INSIDER: Motion Control

Researchers from the University of Houston have demonstrated “giant flexoelectricity” in soft elastomers that could improve robot movement range and make self-powered pacemakers a real...

Question of the Week: Test & Measurement
Will Mobile Radar Replace the Stethoscope?

Our June issue of Tech Briefs highlighted a radar system that enables touch-free monitoring of heart sounds. A significant advantage offered by radar, according to the system’s inventors, is the fact that the values are recorded digitally and are thus not subjective, allowing human error to be...

Blog: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering used a Computational Fluid Dynamics model to find ways to decrease cost and increase usage of cooler surfaces.
Blog: Materials
By introducing nanoparticles into ordinary cement, Northwestern University researchers have formed a smarter, more durable, and highly functional building material.
Question of the Week: Power
Will Better Sensors Lead to Greater Adoption of Hydrogen Power?

One of the final hurdles to hydrogen power is securing a safe method for spotting hydrogen leaks. A sensor, featured in the June issue of Sensor Technology, has a greater sensitivity than other detectors.

Podcasts: Robotics, Automation & Control
In this episode of Here’s an Idea, we speak to three researchers who are finding ways to automate surgical tasks, from suturing,to spotting tumors.
INSIDER: Test & Measurement

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and...

INSIDER: Test & Measurement

After the optical frequency comb made its debut as a ruler for light, spinoffs followed, including the “astrocomb” to measure starlight and a radar-like comb system to...

INSIDER: Sensors/Data Acquisition

Atomically thin materials are a promising alternative to silicon-based transistors; now researchers can connect them more efficiently to other chip elements.

INSIDER: Electronics & Computers

Physicists from the University of Sussex have developed an extremely thin, large-area semiconductor surface source of terahertz, composed of just a...

Blog: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The Prediction Model for Flashover, or P-Flash, estimates where flashover explosions could occur.
White Papers: Automotive
How to Make Software Faster, Safer, Secure in Regulated Environments?

The race for innovation and cybersecurity in our hyper-connected world has led most organizations to adopt DevSecOps methodologies in their software development and...

White Papers: Photonics/Optics
Fiber Optic Rotary Joints Add a Spin to Sensing, Mobile, and Robotic Fiber Systems

To the passing optical signals, fiberoptic rotary joints (FORJs) are nothing more than fiber connectors, which provide connection between one or multiple...

INSIDER: Power

A sustainable, powerful micro-supercapacitor may be on the horizon. Until now, these high-capacity, fast-charging energy storage devices have been limited by the...

INSIDER: Sensors/Data Acquisition

North Carolina State University engineers continue to improve the efficiency of a flexible device worn on the wrist that harvests heat energy from the human body to monitor health.

INSIDER: Power

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Richland, WA) have shown that low-cost organic compounds hold promise...

INSIDER: Electronics & Computers

A collaboration led by Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) used X-ray nanoimaging to gain an unprecedented view into solid-state electrolytes, revealing previously undetected crystal...

White Papers: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Magnet Valves for Rapid Decompression

When transporting sealed containers by air, protecting against rapid decompression is a constant concern. Traditionally, spring-actuated valves have been used to address this design challenge....

Question of the Week: Electronics & Computers
Will Recyclable Electronics Catch On?

Our June issue of Tech Briefs features a completely recyclable transistor from Duke University. The fully functional semiconductor is made out of three carbon-based inks that can be easily printed onto paper or other flexible, environmentally friendly surfaces.

Blog: Sensors/Data Acquisition
The technology uses tactile sensing to identify objects underground.

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