Blog: Software
A team of researchers at USC is helping artificial intelligence imagine the unseen.
INSIDER: Robotics, Automation & Control

MIT researchers have designed a sharp-tipped robot finger equipped with tactile sensing to meet the challenge of identifying buried objects. Digger Finger was able to dig through granular media such as...

INSIDER: Robotics, Automation & Control

USC researchers unveiled a new simulator for robotic cutting that can accurately reproduce the forces acting on a knife as it slices through common food such as fruit and vegetables....

Question of the Week: Robotics, Automation & Control
Will ‘Air Power’ Boost the Use of Soft Robots?

Our second INSIDER story today highlighted William Grover and his UC Riverside team’s efforts to swap electronics with air.

Blog: Mechanical & Fluid Systems

While soft robots hold promise in applications ranging from search-and-rescue efforts to wearable exoskeletons, the technologies are often held back by the electronics, says William Grover,...

INSIDER: Motion Control

A team of scientists has uncovered how heavy, motorized objects climb steep slopes — a newly discovered mechanism that also mimics how rock climbers navigate inclines. The “micro-swimmers” are about...

INSIDER: Motion Control

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University developed a method that allows non-contact manipulation of small objects using sound waves.

INSIDER: Motion Control

Engineers at UC Riverside developed an air-powered computer memory that can be used to control soft robots. Existing systems for controlling pneumatic soft robots still use electronic...

Question of the Week: Wearables
Will ‘Sweat Power’ Make Wearables Mainstream?

Engineers at the University of California San Diego developed a thin, flexible strip that can be worn on a fingertip and generate small amounts of electricity when a person’s finger sweats or presses on it. (Watch the demo on Tech Briefs TV.)

Blog: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Learn how a low-cost machine known as the 'Coventor' stacks up to a traditional ventilator.
Blog: RF & Microwave Electronics
A self-driving algorithm guides an autonomous vehicle through a traffic scenario that many of us know well: navigating traffic on a crowded, narrow street.
Question of the Week: Electronics & Computers
Will Interstate Power Coils Charge Electric Vehicles as They Drive?

Our “Q&A” article in the July issue of Tech Briefs highlighted the work of Dr. Burak Ozpineci from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Ozpineci and his team are building a wireless power-transmission system that charges an electric vehicle as it drives along the road.

Blog: Electronics & Computers
A reader asks our expert how to contain a "thermal runaway" explosion in a lithium-ion battery.
Blog: Software
"We could imagine a digital twin of just about any system," says Karen Willcox, director of the Oden Institute.
INSIDER: Software

Sometimes photos cannot truly capture a scene. How much more epic would that vacation photo of Niagara Falls be if the water were moving?

INSIDER: Photonics/Optics

Labsphere, Inc. announced plans to locate a Field Line of sight Automated Radiance Exposure (FLARE) testing site at Arizona State University's (ASU) Polytechnic campus as...

INSIDER: Nanotechnology

The demand for detecting infrared (IR) light, invisible to human eyes, is constantly growing, due to a wide variety of applications ranging from food quality control and remote sensing to...

INSIDER: Imaging

Autofocus, Waterproof Lenses

Edmund Optics® (EO) (Barrington, NJ) offers the TECHSPEC® LT Series and TECHSPEC® Cw Series fixed focal length lenses. TECHSPEC® LT Series fixed...

Question of the Week: Energy
Will ‘Mass-Less’ Energy Storage Finally Catch On?

A July Tech Brief highlights a “structural battery” from the Chalmers University of Technology that uses carbon fiber as a negative electrode and a lithium iron phosphate-coated aluminum foil as the positive electrode. The battery works as both a power source and as part of the main...

Blog: Robotics, Automation & Control
UC Berkeley engineers have created a lightweight and durable robot that achieves exquisite control and agility by modulating the electrostatic forces between its feet and surfaces.
Blog: RF & Microwave Electronics
With the help of 12 antennas, Fabio da Silva's m-Widar can spot — and image — objects hidden behind a wall.
Question of the Week: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Should Cities be More Strategic with Reflective Surfaces?

Cities around the world are adjusting – and in some cases overhauling – their infrastructure in an effort to cool temperatures in their areas. Los Angeles and New York City, for example, have adopted “grey infrastructure” efforts, like applying coatings to roofs and roads so that...

Blog: Green Design & Manufacturing
Could a tool from the dentist's office lead to better recycling of lithium-ion batteries?
Blog: Electronics & Computers
A reader asks a Space Force expert about new markets, including data transport, traffic management, and advanced power.
INSIDER: Materials

Researchers from the University of Houston have demonstrated “giant flexoelectricity” in soft elastomers that could improve robot movement range and make self-powered pacemakers a real...

Question of the Week: Test & Measurement
Will Mobile Radar Replace the Stethoscope?

Our June issue of Tech Briefs highlighted a radar system that enables touch-free monitoring of heart sounds. A significant advantage offered by radar, according to the system’s inventors, is the fact that the values are recorded digitally and are thus not subjective, allowing human error to be...

Blog: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering used a Computational Fluid Dynamics model to find ways to decrease cost and increase usage of cooler surfaces.
Blog: Manufacturing & Prototyping
By introducing nanoparticles into ordinary cement, Northwestern University researchers have formed a smarter, more durable, and highly functional building material.
Question of the Week: Energy
Will Better Sensors Lead to Greater Adoption of Hydrogen Power?

One of the final hurdles to hydrogen power is securing a safe method for spotting hydrogen leaks. A sensor, featured in the June issue of Sensor Technology, has a greater sensitivity than other detectors.

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