Question of the Week: Transportation
Will ‘Developable Mechanisms’ Solve Complex Tasks?

Brigham Young University engineers have created "developable mechanisms" that they hope to use in components like surgical instruments, adjustable airplane wings, robotic arms, or vehicle cylinders. Watch the demo on Tech Briefs TV, to see how the flat shapes can be converted into 3D...

Master Bond (Hackensack, NJ) focuses on developing the best in epoxies, silicones, UV cures, and other specialty adhesive systems including compounds that have passed NASA...

Graphene may play a greater role in tomorrow electronics, thanks to an achievement from the Technical University of Denmark.
How do you regulate a system that, in effect, is learning as it goes?
Question of the Week: Test & Measurement
Would You Use Wearables to Monitor Your UV Exposure?

Our February issue of Tech Briefs highlights a technology called My Skin Track UV. The 12 x 6 mm wearable sensor can be attached to clothing or accessories to detect sunburn and overexposure to ultraviolet light.

Question of the Week: Materials
Where Do You See Self-Healing Rubber Being Used?

In our lead INSIDER story today, USC Professor Qiming Wang said he hopes to see his team’s self-repairing rubber supporting everything from shoes to battle armor and airplane wings.

Blog: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
A Morphing Soft Actuator Expands the Motion Options
Even a shape-morphing plane is possible, says Harvard's Ehsan Hajiesmaili.
A new material development from USC brings us a step closer to self-healing sneakers.
Question of the Week: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Have You Conducted an FMEA?

With design, it pays to anticipate problems — and solve them — during product development.

INSIDER: Electronics & Computers
Computer Chip Vulnerabilities Discovered

A Washington State University research team has uncovered significant and previously unknown vulnerabilities in high-performance computer chips that could lead to failures in modern electronics....

A new device developed by Stanford University researchers could make it easier for doctors to monitor the success of blood vessel surgery. The sensor monitors the flow of blood...

The quest to develop microelectronic devices with increasingly smaller size, which underpins the progress of the global semiconductor industry...

By adding nanopores to nickel, James Pikul and his team created a kind of "metallic wood."
INSIDER: Mechanical & Fluid Systems
Ultraviolet Light Controls Fluid Flow

A simple, inexpensive method uses ultraviolet light to control particle motion and assembly within liquids. The method encourages particles to gather and organize at a specific location within a...

INSIDER: Manufacturing & Prototyping
3D-Printed Soft Mesh Robots Move on Water

North Carolina State created 3D-printed flexible mesh structures that can be controlled with applied magnetic fields while floating on water. The structures can grab small objects and carry water...

A Failure Analysis may help find problems during product development, but what role should top management play in an FMEA?
Question of the Week: Electronics & Computers
Will ‘Embodied Logic’ Support New Monitoring Applications?

In today’s lead INSIDER story, Professor Jordan Raney said that the most interesting feature of his embodied-logic system is its ability to monitor an environment for a very long period of time, without needing a continued input of energy.

Professor Jordan Raney spoke with Tech Briefs about what’s possible when you can embody 3D-printed objects with logic.

An ultrafast laser that fires pulses of light just 100 millionths of a nanosecond in duration could potentially revolutionize the way NASA technicians manufacture...

Researchers from the University of Houston have devised a new machine learning algorithm that is efficient enough to run on a personal computer and predict the properties of more than...

GigE Vision Interface

Pleora Technologies (Ottawa, Canada) introduced the imaging market’s first external frame grabber that converts Sony FCB-EV7520A block cameras into GigE...

INSIDER: Photonics/Optics
Detecting Light in a Different Dimension

Scientists from the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) — a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory — have dramatically improved...

Question of the Week: Automotive
Do You Feel Safe Behind the Wheel of a Connected Car?

Our Here's an Idea podcast episode led the INSIDER today, and explored how today's auto manufacturers are working to protect connected cars from a range of threats, including ransomware and a remote takeover of the vehicle's controls.

David Barzilai from Karamba Security tells Tech Briefs what threats to the connected car concern him the most.
Question of the Week: Green Design & Manufacturing
Can AI Prevent Famine?

Today's INSIDER story demonstrated how artificial intelligence models are being used to mark areas most in need of famine relief and funding. Ed Hsu from the World Bank spoke at CES last week about his collaboration with AI heavyweights Google, Microsoft, and Amazon.

From CES 2019: Tech Briefs looks at three standout health-monitoring products.
From CES 2019: For famine relief, the World Bank is turning to artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning.
Question of the Week: Electronics & Computers
Do You Expect Successful Cyberattacks on Today’s Connected Cars?

In today’s lead story, Stacy Janes showed optimism regarding the security of connected cars.

Professor Sherry Towfighian spoke with Tech Briefs about how a new MEMS design will improve our cell phones and power lines.
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Would You Use a ‘SwingBot?’

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