Materials & Coatings

Adding Value to Additive Manufacturing, Creative Solutions using Bioresorbable Polymers

Join Poly-Med’s CTO, M. Scott Taylor, Ph.D. for his presentation, “Adding Value to Additive Manufacturing, Creative solutions using bioresorbable polymers.” Dr. Taylor’s talk will highlight the unique chemistry behind bioresorbable polymers and the newest platforms to design medical devices using additive manufacturing.

Posted in: MDB, Webinars, On-Demand Webinars, Materials, Medical
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Tough, Self-Healing Rubber Developed

Imagine a tire that could heal after being punctured or a rubber band that never snapped.

Posted in: News, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials
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Trends in Hydraulic Filtration

Proper filtration plays an important role in ensuring that hydraulic systems operate trouble-free. High-performance filters maintain the cleanliness of the hydraulic fluid over its entire service life. In addition, designers are faced with ever-changing application requirements — longer filter change intervals, higher operating safety, increased separation efficiencies, and increased compatibility with the new generation of hydraulic oils. Following is an overview of some important technologies and trends in the industry, and their impact on users of hydraulic systems.

Posted in: Articles, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials, Fluid Handling, Joining & Assembly, Mechanical Components, Motion Control
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LEARNING TO CRAWL: Origami Robot Moves Like an Earthworm

A team of engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign built a new kind of crawler robot. The wheel-less design takes inspiration from two unconventional sources: origami and the earthworm. Assistant professors Aimy Wissa and Sameh Tawfick, along with a team of graduate and undergraduate students, used “Kresling” paper-folding principles to create buildingblock actuators (Figure 1).

Posted in: Articles, Materials, Motion Control, Motors & Drives, Automation, Robotics
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Rubber Material Enables Scratch-Proof Surfaces

The slippery state caused by water or oil is called superlubricity — where there is basically no friction on a surface. In graphene, this superlubricity state comes from atomic orbitals that compose carbon atoms. To generate friction, some orbitals must overlap and heat, or some energy must be released. Graphene does not require this process; rather, it spontaneously slides on top of other layers, but does not release heat. Graphene, which is 300 times stronger than steel, becomes mechanically weaker and can easily break.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials
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Ultrathin Semiconductor Materials “Rust” to Insulate Circuitry

Silicon has several qualities that have led it to become the bedrock of electronics. One is that it features a very good “native” insulator — silicon dioxide, or silicon rust. Exposing silicon to oxygen during manufacturing gives chip makers a way to isolate their circuitry. Other semiconductors do not “rust” into good insulators when exposed to oxygen, so they must be layered with additional insulators — a step that introduces engineering challenges. Two new ultrathin materials share that trait, making them promising materials for electronics of the future.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials
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Aluminum Alloy for High-Temperature Applications

NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center originally developed a high-performance piston alloy to meet U.S. legislative restrictions on vehicular exhaust hydrocarbon emissions. NASA 398 aluminum alloy exhibits excellent tensile and fatigue strength at elevated temperatures. NASA 398 alloy also offers superior wear resistance, surface hardness, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials
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Strong, Self-Healing Rubber

Self-healing hydrogels rely on water to incorporate reversible bonds that can promote healing. Engineering self-healing properties in dry materials, such as rubber, has proven more challenging because rubber is made of polymers often connected by permanent, covalent bonds. In order to make a rubber self-healing, the bonds connecting the polymers have to be reversible so that the bonds could break and reform.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials
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Software Helps Optimize World’s Largest All-Composite Aircraft

Collier Research Corp.
Newport News, VA
HyperSizer.com

When the Stratolaunch aircraft rolled out of the Mojave, CA Air and Space Port hangar this spring in preparation for ground testing, it was a clear example of how far the design and manufacturing of composite materials has progressed. In September, the first phase of engine testing on the aircraft’s six Pratt & Whitney turbofan engines was completed.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Aerospace, Aviation, Composites, Materials, Software
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Multi-Functional Yarns and Fabrics with Anti-Microbial, Anti-Static, and Anti-Odor Characteristics

Prior art fabrics used to manufacture military combat uniforms typically are made from yarns comprised of a blend of cotton and nylon fibers. This blend supports dyeing and printing techniques that use a combination of acid and vat dyes to impart a camouflage pattern. The yarns made from the blend are combined with lightweight, thin fabric construction to produce fabrics that provide comfort, durability, and UV resistance. Other fabrics, such as flame-retardant fabrics, are made from blends of Nomex® synthetic fiber meta-aramid fiber, Kevlar® synthetic fiber para-aramid fiber, and P140 electrostatic-dissipative fiber, and also provide a level of visual and near-infrared camouflage protection; however, they do not provide anti-odor, anti-micro-bial, or electrostatic dissipation performance in a single, complete fabric. Other prior art techniques involve treating uniform fabrics with antimicrobial treatments, but some of these are not durable and wear out after repeated laundering.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials
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