Energy

Energy Harvesting

Here are the latest technical briefs and resources for design engineers working in energy harvesting. Find trending applications used in wireless autonomous devices in electronics, and wireless sensor networks.

Latest Briefs & News

Almost all satellites are powered by solar cells – but solar cells are heavy. While conventional high-performance cells reach up to three watts of electricity per gram,...

Articles: Manufacturing & Prototyping
Wiegand Wire: Energy Harvesting and More
With the emergence of a new generation of ultra-efficient electronic chips, the Wiegand technology is showing significant promise, especially in the exciting area of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT).
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
Transparent Graphene Electrodes
A new roll-to-roll production method could enable lightweight, flexible solar devices and a new generation of display screens.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
Wearable Strain Sensor Using Light Transmittance
This technology shows potential for the detection of subtle human motions and the real-time monitoring of body postures for healthcare applications.
A new system from Oak Ridge National Laboratory enables electric vehicles to be charged while on the road.
The patch could serve as a personal thermostat and save energy.
Question of the Week: Energy
Will We Ever See Humidity Panels Alongside Solar Panels?

Our lead INSIDER story featured an experiment from Tel Aviv University that supports the idea of water vapor as an alternative energy source.

What do you think? Will We Ever See Humidity Panels Alongside Solar Panels?

Share your questions and comments.

A new metal-air scavenger works like a battery, in that it provides power by repeatedly breaking and forming a series of chemical bonds. But it also works like a harvester,...

"Who knows? Maybe one day we will have roofs covered with humidity panels together with solar panels," TAU professor Colin Price told Tech Briefs.
This type of energy source could be the basis for robots that seek out and “eat” metal, breaking down its chemical bonds for energy like humans do with food.
This method of producing clean syngas could be used to develop a sustainable liquid fuel alternative to gasoline.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
Wearable Device Monitors Health
The flexible device harvests heat energy from the body to monitor health.
The rainproof, stainproof technology turns clothing into self-powered remotes while turning away bacteria.
This new design could conserve energy used for defrosting airplanes, appliances, and more.
Applications include powering portable electronic devices and sensors, and harvesting waste mechanical energy for aircraft, automobile, and other transportation equipment.
A wearable energy harvesting device could generate energy from the swing of an arm while walking or jogging.

Materials called perovskites show strong potential for a new generation of solar cells, but they’ve had trouble gaining traction in a market dominated by...

These actuators provide active flow control for airfoil surfaces and supersonic inlets of wing-borne vehicles.
This technology could impact new directions in robotics design.
Question of the Week: Energy
Will Rain Become a Viable Energy Source?

Our lead INSIDER story today demonstrated the power of a droplet energy generator – specifically the system’s ability to light up 100 LEDs with just a small amount of water.

An energy breakthrough from the City University of Hong Kong finds power in a single drop of water – up to 140 volts, in fact.
This approach is a cost-effective way to convert carbon dioxide gas into methane.
These robust materials convert excess heat energy into electricity.
This technology enables methane metabolism by yeast.
These stickers wirelessly beam health readings to a receiver clipped onto clothing.
Briefs: Electronics & Computers
Device Creates Electricity from Snowfall
The nanogenerator also acts as a weather station.
Changing directions of twist and coiling changes whether a material cools or heats.
Briefs: Communications
Photovoltaic-Powered Sensors
RFID-based devices work in indoor and outdoor lighting conditions and could transmit data for years before they need to be replaced.
When combined with saltwater, rust can be a source of electricity.

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