Energy

Creating the Future: A Conformal Battery Takes Shape – Any Shape

Electronics design is often limited by the shape of the battery – a critical, but frequently uncompromising product component. A new kind of battery conforms to meet the specific shape of a given device.

Posted in: News, Energy, Energy Storage, Materials
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Will the "Create the Future" reactor help power plants reduce their carbon-dioxide emissions?

Developers of a "HI-Light" chemical reactor were awarded top honors in this year’s 'Create the Future' Design Contest. The grand-prize-winning solar thermal device mimics plant photosynthesis and converts carbon dioxide emissions into a clean energy resource.

Lead researcher Elvis Cao envisions the up-scaled reactor alongside power plants, converting a facility's wasted CO2-rich flue gas. What do you think?

Will the "Create the Future" reactor help power plants reduce their carbon-dioxide emissions?

Posted in: Question of the Week, Energy, Energy Storage, Renewable Energy
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This Year’s ‘Create the Future’ Contest Winner: A Highlight in Carbon-Dioxide Conversion

Developers of a “HI-Light” chemical reactor were awarded top honors in this year’s "Create the Future" Design Contest. The grand-prize-winning solar thermal device mimics plant photosynthesis and converts carbon dioxide emissions into a clean energy resource.

Posted in: News, Alternative Fuels, Energy, Energy Harvesting, Energy Storage, Renewable Energy, Solar Power
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Will we drive on piezoelectric highways?

Today's lead INSIDER story showcased efforts from Lancaster University to create road-ready piezoelectric tiles. The electricity generated from the ceramics (and the vehicles driving over them) could someday be used to power street lamps and traffic lights.

What do you think? Will we drive on piezoelectric highways?

Posted in: Question of the Week, Energy, Energy Harvesting, Energy Storage, Renewable Energy, Ceramics, Materials
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A Piezoelectric Highway? Engineers Take Another Test Drive

Researchers from Lancaster University are looking to pave the next generation of smart road surfaces — with piezoelectric ceramics. When embedded in road surfaces, the tiles convert vehicle vibration into electrical energy.

Posted in: News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Harvesting, Energy Storage, Renewable Energy, Thermoelectrics, Ceramics, Materials
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Nanotube Yarns Generate Electricity When Stretched

Scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas and South Korea’s Hanyang University have developed tiny, high-tech yarns that generate electricity when stretched or twisted. The nanoyarns, constructed from hollow carbon nanotubes, create current when coated with an ionically conducting material — even a simple mixture of table salt and water.

Posted in: News, News, Energy, Energy Harvesting
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Perspiration Power: Biofuel Cell Reacts to Sweat

Engineers from the University of California – San Diego have developed stretchable fuel cells that extract energy from an often-unpleasant source: sweat. The flexible UCSD-developed devices are capable of powering wearables and electronics such as LEDs and Bluetooth radios.

Posted in: News, Energy, Energy Harvesting, Energy Storage, Sensors
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Turning Homes into Power Stations

A new solar project, called SUNRISE, will develop printed photovoltaic cells and new manufacturing processes that can be used to construct solar energy products in India. These will then be integrated into buildings in five villages, allowing them to harness solar power to provide their own energy and run off-grid. The plan is to encourage local industries to manufacture affordable prefabricated buildings that can generate, store, and release their own power.

Posted in: INSIDER, Energy Storage, Renewable Energy, Solar Power
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Method to Revolutionize Battery Recharging

University of Sydney researchers have developed a three-stage method to recharge zinc-air batteries. While zinc-air batteries are currently used as an energy source in hearing aids and some film cameras and railway signal devices, their widespread use has been hindered by the fact that, up until now, recharging them has proved difficult.

Posted in: INSIDER, Energy Efficiency, Energy Storage
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Will "Electric Clothing" appeal to consumers?

Last week's INSIDER lead story featured an ultra-thin energy harvester from Vanderbilt University. Made from materials five thousand times thinner than a human hair, the technology may someday be woven into clothing to power personal devices. What do you think? Will "Electric Clothing" appeal to consumers?

Posted in: Question of the Week, Energy, Energy Harvesting, Energy Storage
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