Imaging

Device-Free Motion Tracing Using WiFi Signals

Fine-grained human motion tracing — the ability to trace the trajectory of a moving human hand or leg, or even the whole body — is a general capability that is useful in a wide variety of applications. It can be used for gesture recognition and virtual touch-screens (e.g. Kinect-style natural user interfaces), activity recognition, monitoring of young infants and the elderly, or security applications such as intruder detection. Motivated by these applications, depth-sensing-based systems have been developed to implement motion tracing capabilities in cameras; however, these devices are limited because they have a constrained field of view (around 2 to 4 m range with a 60-degree aperture), and do not work in non-line-of-sight scenarios, preventing their use in many applications such as whole-home activity recognition, security, and elderly care.

Posted in: Briefs, Imaging
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Detector System for High-Resolution Imaging

A large-area detector without any dead space capable of handling a large dynamic range does not currently exist. Current large-area detectors have dead zones created by abutting several modules together. These detectors are counting detectors, which are good only for low-flux operations. Other integrating detectors currently being developed are also modular assemblies with dead areas, and are expandable in only one direction (as these are only two-side-buttable).

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Method for Tracking Moving Targets

Moving target indication (MTI) methodologies are essential tools to detect, locate, recognize, and track the moving targets of interest in a movie or video sequence. Different MTI methodologies can be characterized and compared by their hit rates (percentage of all available targets of interest detected and located), recognition rates (percentage of each of the existing target types correctly recognized), false-alarm rates (average number of false alarms reported per video frame), efficiency of operation (how much computational resources and time is needed for a given set of data), and robustness (how well the methodology is able to handle or adapt to different types of data). An ideal MTI methodology should generally be able to detect, recognize, and track all targets of interest without incurring an unacceptable number of false alarms under a very stringent computational requirement.

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Method Uses Drones and WiFi to Enable 3D Through-Wall Imaging

WiFi signals are everywhere. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, or drones) are expected to become a larger part of everyday life. A new methodology was developed for high-resolution, 3D, through-wall imaging of completely unknown areas, using only WiFi signals and UAVs. The approach utilizes only WiFi received signal strength measurements, does not require prior measurements in the area of interest, and the objects do not have to move to be imaged.

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Image-Based User Authentication

In other user authentication systems, a user authenticates identity by selecting a particular image that is then matched to a previous choice. This invention enables greater security for access control systems by combining facial recognition technology with a user authentication question.

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Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA, has been operated by Battelle and its predecessors since the lab’s inception in 1965. For more than 50 years, PNNL has advanced the frontiers of science and engineering, making fundamental scientific discoveries and solving problems in energy, the environment, and national security.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Defense, Energy, Energy Storage, Green Design & Manufacturing, Remediation Technologies, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Imaging, Composites, Materials, Plastics, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, Research Lab, Robotics, Detectors, Sensors
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New Products: November 2017 Photonics & Imaging Insider

Laser Confocal Scanning Microscope

The new Olympus (Waltham, MA) LEXT® OLS5000 3D laser confocal scanning microscope delivers precise imaging in a fast, easy-to-use system for research and development and quality control inspection. 4K scanning technology and optics designed specifically for the OLS5000 microscope enable the detection of near-perpendicular features and small steps at close to nano-scale. The system acquires data four times faster and improves the user experience with intuitive software designed to automate many common settings. An expansion frame and a dedicated, long working distance (LWD) lens perform precise measurements on samples up to 210 mm in height and concavities up to 25 mm deep — even those with uneven surface cracks.

Click here to learn more.

Posted in: Cameras, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Imaging, Machine Vision, Visualization Software, Sensors, Software
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Unique Imaging of Dinosaur's Skull Tells Evolutionary Tale

Researchers using Los Alamos' unique neutron-imaging and high-energy X-ray capabilities have exposed the inner structures of the fossil skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosauroid dinosaur nicknamed the Bisti Beast in the highest-resolution scan of tyrannosaur skull ever done. The results add a new piece to the puzzle of how these bone-crushing top predators evolved over millions of years.

Posted in: News, Imaging
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New Dental Imaging Method Uses Squid Ink to Fish for Gum Disease

Squid ink might be a great ingredient to make black pasta, but it could also one day make getting checked for gum disease at the dentist less tedious and even painless. By combining squid ink with light and ultrasound, a team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed a new dental imaging method to examine a patient's gums that is non-invasive, more comprehensive, and more accurate than the state of the art.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Imaging, Patient Monitoring
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Future Smartwatches Could Sense Hand Movement Using Ultrasound imaging

New research has shown future wearable devices, such as smartwatches, could use ultrasound imaging to sense hand gestures. The research team is led by Professor Mike Fraser, Asier Marzo, and Jess McIntosh from the Bristol Interaction Group at the University of Bristol in the U.K., together with University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Imaging, Sensors
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